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ITIL :: View topic - MS Access and Change Management
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MS Access and Change Management

 
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joe_bake
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Joined: Mar 10, 2008
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:59 am    Post subject: MS Access and Change Management Reply with quote

What's your policy for Changes in MS Access databases? We plan to make only big and new projects go as RFCs. Any small fix would go as an Incident. We thought that with the quantity of small fixes that are done every day (new functionalities requested by users, changes in layout, etc.) it would be more convenient to have only big and new projects go as RFCs. Here the word "big" is a bit arbitrary, big is any change that would need to go through a SDLC process (Analysis, Design, blah blah). "New" is any new MS Access database.

What's your opinion / How's it done at your organization?

Thank you,
Joe
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UrgentJensen
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Joined: Feb 23, 2005
Posts: 458
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2008 1:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Joe,

Have it as you like. As long as you document exactly what is classified as a change, and the metrics around it, along with a consistent process that everyone follows then you'll be alright.

If you've got an existing SDLC then you need to take that into account in terms of the RFC submission lead time as the both processes need to work together.

Not sure if this is what you were implying, but I would suggest you don't have a separate change management process for different types of technology though, that would be missing the point somewhat.

Cheers,

UJ
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UKVIKING
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Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3292
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Tue Mar 11, 2008 1:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Treat the MS Database as an application and apply Application Change Management to changes in forms, fields, reports etc

If you have some sort fo change management process for other databses and other applciations.. use that one
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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elewis33
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Joined: Apr 01, 2008
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Location: Salt Lake City, UT USA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 02, 2008 1:04 pm    Post subject: Re: MS Access and Change Management Reply with quote

joe_bake wrote:
What's your policy for Changes in MS Access databases?
Joe


Irrespective of the technology that an application is based on, I would think you'd want to base your change policy on things like criticality of the applications, number of users and the impact to the business if the application goes offline unexpectedly.

Since MSAccess is a desktop developer tool, the developers that use it generally don't have the same kind of discipline as developers that work with the more traditional development tools (C++, VB, .NET, etc...).

If I might suggest an idea, where an application is critical to the business and the users will get pretty upset if it goes offline, you might get them (the users) to agree to use a release mentality for their changes. Rather than just ripping them out as quickly as they can, bundle them up into a release of fixes/enhancements. Users of critical systems generally understand applying some discipline if they understand that not doing so will impact them getting their jobs done.

Earl
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