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ITIL :: View topic - Lean CHG flow
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Lean CHG flow

 
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AndyW
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Joined: Feb 14, 2008
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2008 11:53 pm    Post subject: Lean CHG flow Reply with quote

Hi,
I'm currently redesigning our companies CHG Workflow. I've checked this flow example: http://www.itilcommunity.com/modules.php?name=Content&pa=showpage&pid=4

but I'm not really happy with the REL part in it. My understanding was that REL does not belong to (or into) the CHG process.

I wonder what workflow steps other companies propose what make sense.

I'm thinking of:
1. Raise
2. Assess Change
3. Line Manager Sign-off
4. Build
5. Test
6. CAB
7. Implementation

What do you think which steps make sense for a lean process flow?

cheers,
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UKVIKING
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Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3298
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2008 1:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

REL is release mgmt - which is the process to IMPLEMENT the change

whether it is an official release mgmt process or not

change mgmt merely controls the implementation

The ditty

F P C A B I W S

Filter Prioritize classify assess authorize build implement work? success

this came straight from ITIL
how ever you want to do it great

but I would have authorize before build. because why build a change if it aint going to implemented

this assumes that yoiu have to roll out a package (release)

a lot of changes are implemented w/o a build process
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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mnsmith
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Joined: Mar 31, 2008
Posts: 109
Location: North West England

PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2008 1:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi

Your proposed workflow does include release management as follows:

1. Raise (change management)
2. Assess Change (change management)
3. Line Manager Sign-off (change management)
4. Build (release management)
5. Test (release management)
6. CAB (release management)
7. Implementation (release management)

What you are actually doing is passing the responsibility of approving a change to the line manager and the responsibility of approving the release to the CAB.

ITIL tells us that change, config and release are closely integrated, which is why change process flow diagrams always have an element of release in them because you can't implement a change without release management, no matter how small.

Mick Smith
Change, Config and Release Manager
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AndyW
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Joined: Feb 14, 2008
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 9:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ok thanks for your comments.
I have a question regarding authorization.
According to the post from UKVIKING the flow has only one authorization step (Filter Prioritize classify assess authorize build implement work?) does this mean you have 2 authorization steps in a row? For example the line manager authorizes the change in terms of feasability, resource availabilty and budget and as soon it gots approved the CAB also needs to authorize it?
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UKVIKING
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Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3298
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AndyW

Remember

ITIL is prescriptive not restrictive

Filter can mean filter the good RFCs from the crap ones. It could mean quality control such as the CR does not have enough information to proceed etc

This is a good place for a line mgmt or a Change admin function

Authorize means to allow the work to be done to the IT environment

it could be a CAB for a region or some other way to differentiate

the regional CAB could go to a global CAB of the criteria

approved by the regiponal and rejected by the global

It is up to you

The key is that the change is checked to make sure it is worth bringing forward to assess risk and impact

then the change is looked at to see if the risk, impact outweighs the implementation of the change or $$ of the change etc or whether the change outweighs the risk, etc

There needs to be control to make sure that some one say 'yes' the change can go forward on this date.
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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AndyW
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Joined: Feb 14, 2008
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 10:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ok - thanks for the prompt reply.

one further question. I'm a bit confused regarding the terms 'categorize' and 'prioritize' in comprehension to the approval steps. I mean both terms are right now not clearly seperated for me.

I understood that the category determines who has to approve the request.
E.g category = standard --> no approval neccesary

but how does the priority (urgent, high, medium, low) fit into this picture?

Additionally I understood that the CHG Mgr is responsible to set those values e.g. category = normal, priority = medium)
But I can imagine that this can be quite hard to determine what the correct values are since the CHG Mgr usually does not have that much insight knowledge regarding the change.
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UKVIKING
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Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3298
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 10:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

AndyW

The little alphabet soup came from the ITIL course - foundation -

Filter means determine whether the RFC is a RFC
Categorize means put the change in the right (your right) association you use for a type of change
Prioritize means the change should have some sort of classification as to priority// urgency etc

Now for me

Categorize means dividng changes in System change and network changes and application changes and maintainance chaneg etc

If you are only doing system changes then you would divide yoru changes into mainframe , windows O/S, unix etc etc etc

Prioritize would mean

is this an emergency, immediate, standard or normal change....

if I have additional means to classify the change as to the urgency, priority and other ways to classify the change then do so

MAJOR QUESTION: Do you have the Service Support book. If not, get it.

It answers a lot of what I am telling you because what i am saying you can find in the change section

Your basic change process should expand in emergency change process, immediate change process etc etc

Because they are the chanegmodels
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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AndyW
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Joined: Feb 14, 2008
Posts: 77

PostPosted: Mon May 19, 2008 11:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To be honest I find it very confusing. (I think the same applies for other users as well --> see post from Mega Duck: http://www.itilcommunity.com/modules.php?name=Forums&file=viewtopic&t=3212&highlight=priority)

I have the ITIL book infront of me together with some other books and ITIL PowerPoint workshops. The point is that the terms:

- classification
- categorization
- prioritaziation

together with Normal, standard and emergency Changes are often used differently respectively not consistent.
I'm looking for sharp distinction between those terms and then a statement on how all those combinations will affect the approval / decision flow.
e.g. immediate priority --> emergency request etc ...
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UKVIKING
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Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3298
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2008 12:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

andyw

ITIL is not set in stone. It allows for your own variances....

use the blue book

look at flowchart 8.3a

where you see Change Manager, it means actually some in the role of change management

if you have a large enough team, the change mgmt role in the first box would filter the 'good change requests'.

This means that the change raisers would raise all sort of change requests - both useful and useless and then submitt them to the Change team for filtering

If however, you have a 'team lead' who works in the same department as the submitter's; they may be doing the role of change mgmt admin and filter the crap out

and so on and so one for the second box.. A lot of tools who do the work of the second box on behalf of chaneg mgmt

as to the dxecision box where there is determination on whether the chaneg is urgent or not - consider that emergency and immediate changes are URGENT ... giggle

The important thing is that you have the following in yoru change process

1 - a defintion for what is emergency, non emergency, etc changes
2 - an filtering process for getting rid of crap changes
3 - a classification process that helps the risk and imapct etc of the change
4 - an approval process ... a hierarchal approval process is goo
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Diarmid
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Joined: Mar 04, 2008
Posts: 1884
Location: Newcastle-under-Lyme

PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2008 12:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They are used differently by different people and in different contexts because they are generic words and not technical terms.

Classification and categorization have a considerable overlap of meaning. You just have to decide how you use them consistently within your organization and you have to treat them in context when talking to the wider world.

The purpose of classifying or categorizing things is to help to control, understand and analyse entities and events. So you set up classes or categories to suit your purpose.

Prioritization is a more specific word which, properly, is used to indicate how you decide which of two or more tasks to perform first, given a conflicting need for resources in the execution of the tasks. some people have labels like "urgent", "emergency", "normal", back burner" for priorities and then they call that a classification or categorization of the change. This is especially likely if they have different change protocols for the different priorities.

So it is easy to get confused if you do not keep in mind what the context is.

It gets even worse when software (like helpdesk software) insists in using these labels (class, category, priority) with specific attributes and restrictions within their system.
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UrgentJensen
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Joined: Feb 23, 2005
Posts: 458
Location: London

PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2008 1:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Diarmid wrote:


Prioritization is a more specific word which, properly, is used to indicate
It gets even worse when software (like helpdesk software) insists in using these labels (class, category, priority) with specific attributes and restrictions within their system.


Diarmid I know you know this, but I'll state the obvious anyway:

It's all about the doing things in the right order; run your projects correctly and start with requirements gathering, rather than seeing what a I product will do for you. Gets me madder than a bag of cats every time I come across bad PM.

UJ
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asrilrm
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Joined: Oct 07, 2007
Posts: 441
Location: Jakarta, INA

PostPosted: Wed May 21, 2008 12:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

Interesting discussion.
Andy,
I would propose you keep strict on the definitions in the ITIL book.
You may define your own terms and/or definitions of change blablabla but in broader events the understanding of the book will help you speak with people.
I can speak alot about change classification, categorization, prioritization but that would mean I'll be dragging you into my world, as I'm sure other posters would think the same, that it's not right.

Cheers,
Asril
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Ed
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Joined: Feb 28, 2006
Posts: 411
Location: Coventry, England

PostPosted: Wed May 28, 2008 12:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Guys

Sorry I did not get involved sooner, but I have been on my happy holidays.

The flowchart referred to in Andy's initial post is mine from a manual paperbased system. The Release side of life is far from perfect, but did allow for release into live. We have moved on since that was posted and it is not a fully mature process

I, with the other posters, would encourage study of the books to ensure that you understand the subject fully. One of the biggest areas of misunderstanding comes from the difference between a Categorisation of Emergency and a Priority of Urgent.
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Ed
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