Search
Topics
  Create an account Home  ·  Topics  ·  Downloads  ·  Your Account  ·  Submit News  ·  Top 10  
Modules
· Home
· Content
· FAQ
· Feedback
· Forums
· Search
· Statistics
· Surveys
· Top
· Topics
· Web Links
· Your_Account

Current Membership

Latest: LShirk
New Today: 20
New Yesterday: 86
Overall: 139285

People Online:
Visitors: 50
Members: 0
Total: 50

Languages
Select Interface Language:


Major ITIL Portals
For general information and resources, ITIL and ITSM World is the most well known for both ITIL and ITIL Books. A shorter snapshot approach can be found at ITIL Zone

Related Resources
Service related resources
Service Level Agreement
Outsourcing

Note: ITIL is a registered trademark of OGC. This portal is totally independent and is in no way related to them. See our Feedback Page for more information.


The Itil Community Forum: Forums

ITIL :: View topic - ITIL Service Desk Metrics
 Forum FAQForum FAQ   SearchSearch   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

ITIL Service Desk Metrics
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> The ITIL Service Desk
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
funky1
Guest





PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2005 12:11 am    Post subject: ITIL Service Desk Metrics Reply with quote

I am trying to find any ITIL METRICS we can use to calculate staffing numbers for a Help Desk Project I am working on for the government. Does anyone know of any industry standard formulas for doing this. My user community is about 10,000.
-how many help desk calls per hour can we expect
-how many trouble tickets per hour can one person close
-how many systems/accounts can one sys admin manage
-how many helpdesk people are required for 1 site?
-how many users can 1 sys admin support?
Any help on this would be greatly appreciated.

Regards,
Tony
Back to top
Harvey
Itiler


Joined: Oct 26, 2004
Posts: 40

PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2005 7:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am still a newbie, but from what I know, ITIL Metrics would not help you figure out the potential capacity for your Service Desk.

What I have seen of ITIL metrics, are just numbers that you can watch, to really be able to measure the success of your process improvement initiative.

Like, % Incidents solved at first line support, or % of dropped calls, or things of that nature.

I may be wrong, but I don't think ITIL can answer the questions you have.

-Harvey
Back to top
View user's profile
E10
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Aug 06, 2005
Posts: 2
Location: Brussels

PostPosted: Tue Aug 09, 2005 2:42 pm    Post subject: Re: ITIL Service Desk Metrics Reply with quote

funky1 wrote:
I am trying to find any ITIL METRICS we can use to calculate staffing numbers for a Help Desk Project I am working on for the government. Does anyone know of any industry standard formulas for doing this. My user community is about 10,000.
-how many help desk calls per hour can we expect
-how many trouble tickets per hour can one person close
-how many systems/accounts can one sys admin manage
-how many helpdesk people are required for 1 site?
-how many users can 1 sys admin support?
Any help on this would be greatly appreciated.

Regards,
Tony


Tony,

This is a very difficult question and depends of the skill of the enduser. When you handle calls of end users with no skill it can last up to one hour to solve a serious problem.
Most problems are connection problems, when people start working. Connection problems is common knowledge for Service Desk. You can handle this kind of call in two or three minutes from beginning to closure of the call.
Then there is the Software you use. Can work slower installed on Servers, can cost a lot of effort to get it running at proper speed. Operating Systems, virus, E-mail servers clustered on a moment that a Hard Disk is almost full and clients are logging in etc.
Hard to say. But one guy can solve the problem. It costs time ofcorse and in this time he cannot handle another call. etc.
We handle 50 servers per operator. A little to much, 30 would be more than enough. But it can be done with some luck. I do not know how many endusers are connected at those 50 servers. We have an appointment that end users may never call Service Desk. Only a person with proper knowledge about PC or OS can call, to avoid fishing at the ROOT problem.
Back to top
View user's profile
ZRoth
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Sep 08, 2005
Posts: 2
Location: Washington, USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 09, 2005 12:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Six Sigma is your "best practice" from a metric and reporting standard.

For service desk or inbound centers:

AHT - Average Handle Time
SL - Calls answered w/in a specific time.
ASA - Average Speed of Answer
Inbound Calls - Total Daily

Control Lines with Trending and process shifts and/or Control Charts with Average and Range are very telling. If you have the luxury of working in a business with a customer care organization...see if you can utulize their instance of EFW (eworkforce management) for scheduling. Work with your telecom people to pull call data off your PBX/IVR and identify someone to help pull the data together for presentment.

Once you get a handle a calls you can look to merge ticketing data with your call data for FCR and Productivity reports.

Good Luck


[Edited. Reason for edit: Removal of external link]
_________________
"When music and courtesy are better understood and appreciated, there will be no war" - Confucius
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
bossdrum
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Sep 14, 2005
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Wed Sep 14, 2005 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gartner reckon about 1.2 incidents per user per month
this should give you around 12000 incidents a month

Calls per hour will be dependant on the incoming contact methods for the desk if you have e-mail or a web front end/. calls will be lower.

If we take the worse case scenario that phonecalls are you're only contact method, you need to calculate how many working hours there are in a month and then divide 12000 by that figure.

If you're contacts are simple queries and you have a good knowledge strategy you can log and close at point of contact , i'd estimate 10 minutes per call to log, diagnose and close(variable depending on the complexity of your service) - 6 tickets per person per hour

Admin accounts per admin staff - depends how resilient the database is and the time of year, after the summer / christmas holidays evryone usually forgets their passwords so the volumes of calls will be high

Systems/ accounts supportable, depends on the skill of the resource and the reliability of the systems

helpdesk people per site - depends on how many users per site
Back to top
View user's profile
Guest






PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2005 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What you're looking for is some magic bullet that will indicate the relative workload that your team will required to support.

There are many factors that contribute not only to the volume of work, but also to the nature of the work. For instance troubleshooting an application issue usually takes longer and require more resource than resetting a password.

My advice is to:
1. carry out a volumetric analysis on the systems that are currently supported
2. Understand (and agree) with the business stakeholders what services are important to them in terms of cost, capability and reputation, should these service not be available-and here's where ITIL comes in to it - draft and agree a service catalogue with the customer that shows what's supported, when it's supported, and how well it's supported (e.g. Category A rather than Category B system). Only when the team knows what they support, and what there priorities are, can resouces be applied.

The outcome from this is a better understanding of what sort of support needs to be provided, and from this flows indications of the resourcing required to deliver this. It sound a bit hard basket I know, however it's the only effectiove way! Try it - you'll see huge benefits arising from this, such as:

-Foundation for establihing a Service Delivery and Management framework
-Improved customer rapport
-Proactive dialogue
-Justification for increased funding/resources (or not!)

Good luck
Karl
Back to top
Karl Johnson
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2005 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm afraid Harvey's right.

What you're looking for is some magic bullet that will indicate the relative workload that your team will required to support.

There are many factors that contribute not only to the volume of work, but also to the nature of the work. For instance troubleshooting an application issue usually takes longer and require more resource than resetting a password.

My advice is to:
1. carry out a volumetric analysis on the systems that are currently supported
2. Understand (and agree) with the business stakeholders what services are important to them in terms of cost, capability and reputation, should these service not be available-and here's where ITIL comes in to it - draft and agree a service catalogue with the customer that shows what's supported, when it's supported, and how well it's supported (e.g. Category A rather than Category B system). Only when the team knows what they support, and what there priorities are, can resouces be applied.

The outcome from this is a better understanding of what sort of support needs to be provided, and from this flows indications of the resourcing required to deliver this. It sound a bit hard basket I know, however it's the only effectiove way! Try it - you'll see huge benefits arising from this, such as:

-Foundation for establihing a Service Delivery and Management framework
-Improved customer rapport
-Proactive dialogue
-Justification for increased funding/resources (or not!)

Good luck
Karl
Back to top
wolfhard
Itiler


Joined: Mar 14, 2005
Posts: 26
Location: Brussels, Belgium

PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 2:52 am    Post subject: Erlang Formula Reply with quote

I am by no means an expert but as far as I know the Erlang Formula is used widely to estimate staffing needs.
Usually the formula is applied to 15min intervals.
You can find a lot of information here ..
[no links please]

Kind regards
Wolfhard Aring
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
javierarcal
Senior Itiler


Joined: May 27, 2005
Posts: 79
Location: Madrid-Spain

PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 6:03 pm    Post subject: More about Erlang Reply with quote

Thanks Wolfhard for the link,it is really good for Service Desk.

A free erlang calculator to estimate the number of helpdeskers requied could be downoladed from 3w.erlang.com

From my experience designing helpdesk, sometimes results obtained by Erlang should be reviewed and adjust but I fully agree with Wolfhard Erlang Distribution is a very good aproach.

Javier
ITIL Consultant
Madrid Spain
javier.arcal@gmail.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Cybi99
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2005 1:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

GARTNER did a study concerning this in January 2004 :

"What is the right IT service desk staff size and structure?" (5 pages)
Do a search on this on the web.
Back to top
Diarmid
Senior Itiler


Joined: Mar 04, 2008
Posts: 1884
Location: Newcastle-under-Lyme

PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh no!

Not a phishing attack?

A classic example of a self-referential post?
_________________
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
BorisBear
Senior Itiler


Joined: Mar 10, 2008
Posts: 403
Location: Sunderland

PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 9:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cod no!!!

I can feel a haddock coming on
Back to top
View user's profile
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3292
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 9:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My herring is going as well and I am flounder ing as well
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
BorisBear
Senior Itiler


Joined: Mar 10, 2008
Posts: 403
Location: Sunderland

PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 9:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm hake-ing all over


I'll get me coat

Embarassed
Back to top
View user's profile
MBU
Senior Itiler


Joined: Dec 18, 2008
Posts: 70

PostPosted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 10:01 pm    Post subject: Congratulations Reply with quote

Back to Wolfhard:

THIS was an extremely useful hint! thx a lot, whenever you're at Luxembourg I owe you a drink or ten.

Thx,
_________________
Michael B.

"I can't say it'll be better if it changes, but I can say it has to change to be good"
G.C. Lichtenberg (1742 - 1799)
Back to top
View user's profile
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> The ITIL Service Desk All times are GMT + 10 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Powered by phpBB 2.0.8 © 2001 phpBB Group
phpBB port v2.1 based on Tom Nitzschner's phpbb2.0.6 upgraded to phpBB 2.0.4 standalone was developed and tested by:
ArtificialIntel, ChatServ, mikem,
sixonetonoffun and Paul Laudanski (aka Zhen-Xjell).

Version 2.1 by Nuke Cops 2003 http://www.nukecops.com

Forums ©

 

Logos/trademarks property of respective owner. Comments property of poster. Rest 2004 Itil Community for Service Management & Foundation Certification. SV
Site source copyright (c)2003, and is Free Software under the GNU / GPL licence. All Rights Are Reserved.