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ITIL :: View topic - Terminology - common expression
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Terminology - common expression
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MiraH
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 04, 2010 10:10 pm    Post subject: Terminology - common expression Reply with quote

What is the best common expression for ?

- Incident
- Service Request
- Request for Change (RFC)

More options are welcome.

Thanks
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 6:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't understand the question.

Best in what context?

Common - how common?

Expression - in what language?

What is wrong with:

- Incident
- Service Request
- Request for Change (RFC) ?

Does "best common" imply that there are more than two common substitute terms for these? (assuming the expression "term" is at least an adequate substitute for the term "expression", if not the best common expression for it.)
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thechosenone69
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Incident is Incident
Service Request is Service Request
(RFC) Request for change is Request for change

I hope that information was helpful...
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Ali Makahleh
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mnsmith
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 7:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Terminology - common expression Reply with quote

I always find that the most common terminology for each of these word is the word itself, since it's both defined as such in a best practice methodology (ITIL) and an international standard (ISO 20k).

However, the best (not common) expression is:

Incident - "oops I've broken it"
Service Request - "give it to me NOW"
Request for Change (RFC) - "do I really have to submit one of these"
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UKVIKING
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Incident is a IM ticket
SR is a SR ticket
RFC is a CR ticket
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, John, what ticked you off today?

Or is there a metaphor hidden in your contribution?
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UKVIKING
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was trying to translate TCO69 into ticket system references

I was also trying to follow the silliness

Unlike in LI, where I have yet to add to ....what is a defect ?
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 06, 2010 2:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"silliness"?

I've been racking my brain over the relative merit of "term" vis a vis "expression".

Don't tell me I've been wasting my time.
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MiraH
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 08, 2010 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Diarmid wrote:
I don't understand the question.

Best in what context?

Common - how common?

Expression - in what language?

What is wrong with:

- Incident
- Service Request
- Request for Change (RFC) ?

Does "best common" imply that there are more than two common substitute terms for these? (assuming the expression "term" is at least an adequate substitute for the term "expression", if not the best common expression for it.)


I am sorry for ambiguous question. English is not my native language.

I am looking for the best collective term which includes ALL 3 type of terms listed below:
- Incident
- Service Request
- Request for Change (RFC)

thanks Míra


Last edited by MiraH on Mon Mar 08, 2010 6:48 pm; edited 1 time in total
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thechosenone69
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 08, 2010 8:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

uhmm service desk? it feels like crosswords damn thats not 8 characters
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 08, 2010 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

MiraH wrote:
I am sorry for ambiguous question. English is not my native language.

I am looking for the best collective term which includes ALL 3 type of terms listed below:
- Incident
- Service Request
- Request for Change (RFC)


They are not easily subjected to a collective term because incident is not a request (incident request - that's an idea!).

Even if you mean the reporting of an incident, that is still not very like a request.

There are at least two distinct concepts of service request, one of which is really the same thing as a change request (new service request), otherwise service request and change request are also very different animals.

I believe some service desk software likes to lump all communications into a global category and this would satisfy your question (conditional that you mean report of incident when you say incident). However they do not always use the same term. Older ones (I'm guessing) would call everything an incident, while newer ones (I'm still guessing) might call everything a service request on the basis that you can (logically, but not usefully) consider incident reports and change requests as requests for specific "services".

In both cases (and any others) they force you to sort it out meaningfully at a lower level. For my money it is better to classify the top level access to the service desk as a communication and break it down below both for type of communication and medium of communication.
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Timo
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2010 3:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Call
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2010 4:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just said that!

Okay. Good précis, Timo Cool
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DYbeach
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2010 8:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mira....

The word 'call' is being used as a noun here

Hope I am not stating the bleeding obvious to you

(English is also not my first language. I was born in an English speaking country but it was not spoken at home. So I understand the confusion that non English speakers may have)
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MiraH
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 09, 2010 5:21 pm    Post subject: is the term "ticket" suitable ? Reply with quote

Hi Diarmid, Timo, DYbeach,
thank you for your answers.

As we receive about 70% entries via Service desk application, 20% via email, and 10% via phone is the suitable collective term for {Incident, Service Request, Request for Change } "ticket"?

Would sound the sentences below "natural" in (business) English?
" ... Dear client I am about to discuss with you the ticket ..."
" ... I have just changed the type of your ticket from "Service request" to "Request for Change" ..."
" ... I am sorry I have to decline your ticket as it was found unsubstantial ..."

------

Some people suggested "issue", but the others claimed that "issue" evokes problem (not ITIL term "problem"), and consequently problem evokes term "incident". Any ideas about that?
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