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ITIL :: View topic - Which problems do not lead to change management process?
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Which problems do not lead to change management process?

 
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win_vj
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 10:19 pm    Post subject: Which problems do not lead to change management process? Reply with quote

Which problems do not lead to change management process?

Please provide some examples.
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UKVIKING
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 11:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Easy.

Problems that can not be solved
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rpmason
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PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any problem that doesn't need a modification to the infrastructure to correct. Simple example: users call the service desk too often (choose your own number) because some reports contain the wrong information. Root cause analysis determines that the users are defining the reports incorrectly. You don't need a RFC to schedule and provide training. However, if it's an in-house application that produces the reports, the User Guide could change under an RFC (if it's a CI).

Another example would be a problem that's not worth fixing. Maybe the fix is too expensive or maybe the item is at end-of-life anyway.
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Sat Sep 26, 2009 1:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Plus, of course, the problems on the bypass route Twisted Evil
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frenkel
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 3:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Management should be strict, loyal and efficient.There should not be laziness and delay in management work. The information should properly classified and correct. It should not be fake and the most emphasizing should on this main thing that it should be reliable to everyone.
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is that "should be" a categorical imperative, a moral imperative, or just something which will see an ROI?
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pk_
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PostPosted: Wed May 19, 2010 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rpmason wrote:
Another example would be a problem that's not worth fixing. Maybe the fix is too expensive or maybe the item is at end-of-life anyway.


Probably a stupid question, but what's the general opinion on the PM team making decisions like that? Shouldn't the cost/effort vs business case judgement be made during the review of RFCs?

Not wanting to clog up CM with unnecessary RFCs, but if a fix is identified by PM shouldn't they always be offering it up as an option rather than judging its business merit?
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Wed May 19, 2010 7:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The PM team would not make that decision. The business would. Whether that comes about after initiating a request for change or whether it never gets that far is moot.

Unless Problem Management has a very large budget it will not be in a position to sponsor a costly change. But if the costs only emerge late in the day the change process will be under-way. So, either the problem manager or the change manager may be taking the issue to the business but that is where it will be decided.

There is also a distinction to be made between plain "too expensive" and "too expensive at this time". In either case it may be correct to continue investigation seeking cheaper resolutions. You can even argue that an impossibly costly solution is not a solution at all.

Just to make things a bit less simple, the long term solution may be to replace fundamental components (architectures, infrastructures, technologies for example) so that such solutions will be cost effective in the future in a more flexible environment.
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