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Just a translation issue

 
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alexanderff
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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2010 5:44 am    Post subject: Just a translation issue Reply with quote

Hi.

Could someone explains me the following statement? I couldn't make any satisfatory translation...

It's about the challenges in the service management, in the book Service Strategy, End of the page 31 and starting the 32.

"The perishable nature of service output and service capacity: there is
value for the customer in receiving assurance that the service will continue to be supplied with consistent quality. Providers need to secure a steady supply of demand from customers."

Thanks!
Alexander
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LizGallacher
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Location: UK

PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2010 7:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

By perishable nature they mean that unlike supplying goods, which can be manufactured in advance, and held i store for busy times, supplying a service means that you need to be able to supply that service consistently, including at busy times. For example, a Service Desk service has to be able to be provided at the busiest times, being quiet at other times is no help!. In order to be able to deliver this consistency, we ned to have a commitment as to the steadiness of the demand.
Best I can do - it makes little sense even if English is your first language!
Hope it helps
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alexanderff
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PostPosted: Wed May 26, 2010 5:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, it's clear enough to me.

Thank you!!!

But... I promisse I won't get used to ask for translations here, but could you confirm if I've done right below, just this last time (it's in the same topic)?

Code:
High-level of contact for producers and consumers of services: little or no
buffer between the customer, the front-office and back-office.


It means: if I need a service I just take the phone and ask to the producer. It's different in other areas where the producer has some layers of deployment.

Code:
Demand is tightly coupled with customerís assets: users and other
customer assets such as processes, applications, documents and
transactions arrive with demand and stimulate service production.


It means that... ok, it's a mistery... first I thought it means that the production is based in consumer resources (if the client has more resources- money -, so he can get more services), but it doesn't make any sense...

[]'s
Alexander
Brazil
Code:
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LizGallacher
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PostPosted: Wed May 26, 2010 6:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

First one - you are correct - the supplier has no warehouse stocks or similar - he wants an engineer now, or whatever, and you cannot stockpile engineering hours.

Second one - God Knows! Anyone else want to attempt it?
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2010 2:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Demand is complicated and production gets a kick out of it"

"Things happen when there is demand and that leads to the service being delivered (or being lifted from a hat by its long ears).

[Who needs detail?]

It might mean that you can't have demand unless it is associated with customer resources, but that is a tautology.

It might mean, as an example, that if a user logs in to a service, that service is goaded into action.

All in all, I prefer Liz' interpretation.
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tsh
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 11, 2010 3:51 pm    Post subject: demand and customer assets Reply with quote

Code:
Quote:

Demand is tightly coupled with customerís assets: users and other
customer assets such as processes, applications, documents and
transactions arrive with demand and stimulate service production.


I understand this pointing towards customer's actual assets that are underpinned by IT services that enable to release the value they would not otherwise be able to deliver with the assets they have invested in.

For example, in a logistics company these assets may be the trucks and the order processing process they have had running since the times of horse carriages. Now you enable the customer to get more value out of their own assets by offering a logistics IT service including order tracking, sign in / signout of goods, route info, loading information etc - so you have all the people, non-it equipment and non-it processes that are supported by your IT services.

This example came into my mind from one occasion in Aschaffenburg where we jammed a German motorway back in 2003. It was a very wet summer and one network node was flooded the day we had our SAP roll-out for one factory there. They could not print out the information about what to put in which truck (which used to be a manual process earlier). Well, now things are already running much better there.

I hope this interpretation is close to the thinking these guys had in mind when writing this book. I also hope this helps you to figure it out.


Timo[/quote][/code]
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