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ITIL :: View topic - What DOES it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager?
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What DOES it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager?

 
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What is the primary responsibility of a Service Delivery Manager?
Acting as go-between with business stakeholders and IT
33%
 33%  [ 4 ]
Creating and maintaining service catalogue
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Performance management against SLAs and OLAs
16%
 16%  [ 2 ]
Creating and maintaining SLAs, OLAs, and contracts
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Driver of a continuous service improvement programme
50%
 50%  [ 6 ]
Other (please specify in post)
0%
 0%  [ 0 ]
Total Votes : 12

Author Message
itilimp
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Joined: Jan 20, 2006
Posts: 172
Location: England

PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2006 12:11 am    Post subject: What DOES it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager? Reply with quote

Hi all,

I've just been writing my next blog entry (not yet published) but figured that I'd get more responses if I posted here Wink So, time to pick your brains...

Quote:

Over the past 2 years I've been thinking that we could really use a Service Delivery Manager where I work. Curiously enough, it turns out that the new Technical Operations Manager thinks so as well and sees the role as fundamental to contributing to the overall strategy for service provision. So he asked me to write a paper outlining my strategy for service provision over the coming years. Great, except that as the reporting lines have not yet been resolved my line managers are reluctant to let me spend any time researching and writing the report as it will take away from the day job. A fair point, but should I really be doing this in my own time and not being paid for it? Part of me says 'no' - it is for work to benefit therefore I should continue to maintain my work/life balance. Another part says that it is a missed opportunity for me personally if I do not.

Anyhow... all of this has me wondering 'What does it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager?' I believe it is more than service level management as defined by ITIL, and it should include service introduction management. I'd like to write a job description and person specification, so, as a starting point, started trawling job adverts only to find there is a wide range of views. Over the next week or so I'm throwing the question open to the rest of you. I'll write up my answer in a couple of weeks incorporating your views, and although it may not be definitive - hopefully it will be a reasonable answer to an important question.


Please discuss Smile
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markbarr
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Joined: Mar 14, 2006
Posts: 6
Location: UK and Poland

PostPosted: Tue Apr 11, 2006 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I selected "acting as a go between" - but almost put "Driver of CSIP"

In my view they act as an Account/Market/Sales Manager towards the business and an "informed negotiator" towards IT...so they need to be "two faced" Wink In my experience, it is no easy to find such people as they tend to be strong at one or the other. I have seen guys who have been very customer focussed but crumbled when negotiating with the techies.

However, ensuring that the service delivered is constantly looking to improve and offer new benefits to the business in terms of time/quality/cost should be point 2 in any "role requuirement"

IMHO anyway
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itilimp
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Joined: Jan 20, 2006
Posts: 172
Location: England

PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2006 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the votes in so far, and also your post Markbarr.

It's interesting that so far 2 areas are clearly ahead, and it is those same 2 areas that you were trying to choose between.

Although a small sample so far, it certainly reinforces what I suspected to be the case, i.e. aspects of service level management are part of the job but not the main function of the role.

Any one else with a view on this? Or perhaps you are employed as a Service Delivery Manager - what do you do day in day out? Question
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tcrg311
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Joined: Apr 24, 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 4:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is an interesting question. There seems to be so much information and education for Service Support, and relatively little for Service Delivery, and education for non-Service Management ITIL processes is virtually nil.

I'm relatively new to ITIL (have the SM Foundation certificate), and I still don't always "get" the nuances. I have been thinking of Service Delivery as primarily involved with provisioning; Service Support as primarily involved with maintaining. Is this off base?

As a result, I would tend to think of a Service Delivery Manager as providing overall management of IT provisioning for business services. An SD Manager would need to address service level, finance, capacity, continuity, availability and security management processes. A "go-between" seems insufficient, and the CSIP driver is also somewhat limited.

Anyone have feedback on these thoughts. I think I'm still in ITIL's "shallow end".

Thanks!
Mark
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Lola
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Joined: Jun 06, 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 8:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am a Service Delivery Manager and I'm not sure if I can even answer this question.
What I am suppose to be doing is manage the SLA's for the services listed in the service catalogue.
A lot of my time is spent filling out SLA's, which I then take to the business to ensure they meet their needs. I then meet with IT to see if they can provide the level of support requested by the business, etc.

While I should be spending time on the above, I have somehow found myself stuck in the role as as escalation point for unresolved problem tickets. Most of my time is realy spent on trying to get issues resolved.

Part of this may be our lack of problem management resources in my group, I'm not sure if this is an issue other places as well.
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query
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Joined: Feb 02, 2006
Posts: 41
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2006 9:58 am    Post subject: Re: What DOES it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager? Reply with quote

itilimp wrote:
Hi all,

I've just been writing my next blog entry (not yet published) but figured that I'd get more responses if I posted here Wink So, time to pick your brains...

Quote:


Anyhow... all of this has me wondering 'What does it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager?' I believe it is more than service level management as defined by ITIL, and it should include service introduction management. I'd like to write a job description and person specification, so, as a starting point, started trawling job adverts only to find there is a wide range of views. Over the next week or so I'm throwing the question open to the rest of you. I'll write up my answer in a couple of weeks incorporating your views, and although it may not be definitive - hopefully it will be a reasonable answer to an important question.

)


Actually, with the posted choices:

Acting as go-between with business stakeholders and IT
Creating and maintaining service catalogue
Performance management against SLAs and OLAs
Creating and maintaining SLAs, OLAs, and contracts
Driver of a continuous service improvement programme
Other (please specify in post)

I say All of the above plus more

You wrote "does it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager?' I believe it is more than service level management as defined by ITIL", but that's not true. ITIL has a whole book dedicated to Service Delivery broken down into these processes:

Service Level Management
Financial Management for IT Services
Availability Management
Security Management
Capacity Management
And IT Service Continuity Management

I think that the Service Delivery Manager (As per the title) will be responsible for all of the above. Depending on the size of the organization ofcourse these would be seperate roles. But even in the smallest organization I wouldn't advise combining all of the above Management proccesses into one role for one person. Service Delivery Manager I imagine would be effective at managing all of the above proccesses and bear the ultimate responsibility for each one.
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itilimp
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Joined: Jan 20, 2006
Posts: 172
Location: England

PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2006 9:44 am    Post subject: Re: What DOES it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager? Reply with quote

Quote:

ITIL has a whole book dedicated to Service Delivery broken down into these processes:

Service Level Management
Financial Management for IT Services
Availability Management
Security Management
Capacity Management
And IT Service Continuity Management

I think that the Service Delivery Manager (As per the title) will be responsible for all of the above. Depending on the size of the organization ofcourse these would be seperate roles.


Hi Query, and that is part of the point I am getting at. v2 ITIL does have all those processes as 'Service Delivery'. Yet when you look at job descriptions for supposed 'Service Delivery Managers' they are actually quite far removed from this and seem to focus on just the limited aspects of service level management.

If we being to say they are accountable for the management of these processes, doesn't that then venture into the territory that a CIO should be managing rather that a SDM? Where do we draw the line? Of course, the answer to that probably differs from organisation to organisation, but I'm just trying to get a handle on it Smile
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query
Itiler


Joined: Feb 02, 2006
Posts: 41
Location: Sydney, Australia

PostPosted: Fri Jun 09, 2006 11:09 am    Post subject: Re: What DOES it mean to be a Service Delivery Manager? Reply with quote

itilimp wrote:
Hi Query, and that is part of the point I am getting at. v2 ITIL does have all those processes as 'Service Delivery'. Yet when you look at job descriptions for supposed 'Service Delivery Managers' they are actually quite far removed from this and seem to focus on just the limited aspects of service level management.

If we being to say they are accountable for the management of these processes, doesn't that then venture into the territory that a CIO should be managing rather that a SDM? Where do we draw the line? Of course, the answer to that probably differs from organisation to organisation, but I'm just trying to get a handle on it Smile
Hi itilimp. I see. I understand what you are saying a little bit better now. If that's the case then the organizations that look for a "Service Delivery Manager" who just focus on aspect of Service Level Management are not have defined the role title incorrectly. The actual role is "Service Level Manager" (Which coincidently is also another component of Service Delivery.) Ultimately the Service Delivery Manager would be in charge of Service Level Manager.

Organizations not defining a role properly is not something uncommon. Not many people know as much as us about the break down of each role and control and repsonsiblities that these roles entail. Some organizations due to the lack of knowledge define these roles incorrectly, just in the same way as a role of a network engineer is sometimes defined as a Systems Administrator, and Service Desk Operator as a Systems Administrator, it's not very uncommon to see this.

As far as the role of CIO goes I would say that a CIO is not a Service Delivery Manager. A CIO is ultimately responsbile for all internal IT proccesses of the Organization (I.e. CIO's role is covered in all 7 ITIL books, Service Delivery is only 1). Once again however, this is often misinterpretted by the business and sometimes a person in the role of an IT Manager or Service Delivery Manager ends up with the status of a CIO (However for example managing only Service Delivery component)

This is exactly why I think that people like us, who know the nuts and bolts of ITSM not only from technical perspective, but also from the operational and functional perspectives have a very bright future ahead!!
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