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ITIL :: View topic - Making ITIL/ITSM into a Reality
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Making ITIL/ITSM into a Reality

 
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jeffendy
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Joined: Aug 20, 2006
Posts: 25
Location: Indonesia

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:23 pm    Post subject: Making ITIL/ITSM into a Reality Reply with quote

We all know that the management processes and Service Desk function in ITIL are good to adopt. I like to start a discussion on how to turn this into a reality. I have a customer who are really keen to adopt ITIL/ITSM in their IT organization but don't know what, how, and when to start. Do we have to start from Configuration Management and Change Management first or other processes first? Need a quite brief explanation on this.

Other thing I need to know is the difference between ITIL and ITSM. CMIIAW, my understanding is that the ITIL is only a collection of best practices while the ITSM provides a model for a company to refer to when they want to turn it into a reality. Anybody can help? Thanks in advance.
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m_croon
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Joined: Aug 11, 2006
Posts: 262
Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Jeffendy,

First of all, this is what HP says on their website (I know ITSM as a HP approach):

Quote:
Transforming IT organizations into service providers

The HP IT Service Management (ITSM) White Paper (pdf) introduces IT organizations to ITSM solutions. ITSM is based on the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) the most comprehensive and respected source of information about IT processes ever written. An invaluable resource for organizations seeking to implement IT Service Management, ITIL has enjoyed widespread adoption by successful companies and governments worldwide


Apart from this, I would not start with a proces, I'd do the following:
1. Analyse actual problems / issues in the organisation
2. Have a consultancy firm check on the state of your processes by doing some standard scan.
3. Determine which proces(ses) (if any) can help solve the problems defined under 1.
4. Depending on the organisational maturity, start low key with some quick wins
5. Start reporting on your operational workload at once. Keep it simple: a short but weekly report on disruptions/changes logged/closed (org. wide) and open (per team). Publicise this report. Be prepared for some emotion and make sure that the management team backs this up, as people might nog understand why this is necesary.
6. After aprox. 3 months, when the mindset of the organisation is changed through quick wins and reports, define a more concise plan on what to do.

For a general overview of reasons for failure / succes in organisational change, google on John P. Kotter and his 8 reasons for succes. Has nothing to do with ITIL, but very usefull.

Hope this helps, cheers,

Michiel
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jeffendy
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Joined: Aug 20, 2006
Posts: 25
Location: Indonesia

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 7:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Michiel for the info. I agree with that. Currently, the Service Desk (not true Service Desk) is already there. Change Management has been implemented but I am not really satisfy because every division or workgroup in IT (i.e.: Desktop Support, Business Application, Upstream Application, SCADA Application, etc.) has it's own Change Process. Since no one can know all things then we have to have a Change Manager for each of them. Configuration Management has been implemented for all desktops, notebooks, and printers.

The main issue in this customer is that they cannot measure their services that are delivered to the end users. Developing OLA is a nightmare for them. Only one UC exist for telecommunication service.

It is good to address the points you mentioned. Do you think that the HP ITSM Reference Model 3.0 can help a lot to guide us in linking all management processes required?

Are you familiar with HP ITSM Reference Model 3.0? Or maybe you work in HP? Smile
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m_croon
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Joined: Aug 11, 2006
Posts: 262
Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, I do not work for HP Very Happy

I am not too familiair with the ITSM model.

Your remark about change management strikes me. I think it is very well possible to have separate CAB's (why bother the desktop dept with stuff about bus. applications), as long as one person keeps a good overview over all the departments and makes sure that changes with impact > 1 division are discussed in an organisation wide CAB. Now that would be a true change/proces manager, whilst the leader of each CAB will be a role or function in the process that might very well be filled in by somebody else (especially if it is a big organisation).

For this, you need a clear definition / categorization of changes according to impact/scope (within one division as opposed to org. wide changes).

What do you mean with this remark? Can you explain a bit more please?

Quote:
The main issue in this customer is that they cannot measure their services that are delivered to the end users.
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jeffendy
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Joined: Aug 20, 2006
Posts: 25
Location: Indonesia

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For example if the end user calls the Service Desk reporting that his/her cable TV line is broken, it is hard for the agent to determine how long will it take to repair that line. This is because the telecommunication and network division doesn't have any measurement on this. That is why they can't provide OLA.

Hope that this can make you clear on the remark.

Thanks.
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m_croon
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Joined: Aug 11, 2006
Posts: 262
Location: Netherlands

PostPosted: Fri Aug 25, 2006 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

But if I understand you correctly, these divisions are all part of one organisation (or are they also external suppliers?).

Is the OLA problem about willingnes or ability? (do all parties want to cooperate? Do they have the means to work on OLA's?).

I would not pay attention to OLA's at first. If I were you, I'd first look at the end-to-end resolution times of calls. As I said before, draw up a small and weekly report on logged/closed calls and open calls (per division/workgroup). Use this to establish a sense of urgency and to get commitment from management. Please have a look at Kotter on the internet, his 8 steps are usefull.

Cheers,

Michiel
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Guerino1
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Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 500
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Jeffendy,

One of the things we do with our customers is to introduce them to the tracking of their ITIL related entities. It's a very easy win and starts to get them into a position of quickly accumulating information that allows for measurement and trending. Once you have such information, you start to have "tangible" results and with these tangible results, you can start to use them to justify future improvements and work.

For example:

Create a standard Incident template.
Create a standard Change template.
Create a standard Problem template.
Etc.

Once you have them, quickly get them out to each and every group and start the education process as to what they are, how to fill them out, when to fill them out, etc.

Then teach them to work and manage, themselves, off of these lists. For example, Development teams can use Problem Management lists as a way to track and manage their defects/bugs.

Then you can start to put some review and management process around each of these repositories of information, such as directing the the flow of such information to key stakeholders, based on their needs. For example, all Change information goes to the Change Manager(s) every Tuesday by noon, before a Thursday afternoon Release.

You will get pushback when it comes to filling in the forms, especially if they're not part of an online and active system that allows them to electronically manage their work. Many people don't want to be bothered with the collection of information if they're the ones that have to go through the formalities. But, if you're getting support from upper management, this should be easier.

As far as where to start, I usually recommend that you start "everywhere". It sounds far fetched but it's true. In many enterprises, Development teams already manage their bug/defect lists. Help Desks already deal with "calls". Release teams already try and coordinate the flow of modifications into their environments. You can leverage such existing work to simply improve upon what they do.

If you're in an enterprise that's not already doing these types of things, then you will need to work with the teams to get them to understand the value of "working consistently". You will need to pitch "why" it's important for all teams to track and manage "Problems" the same way. You will need to specify "what" the benefits are. And, you will need to specify "who" does it, "how" it's done", and "when" it's done so that there is no confusion.

You will need to be a change agent and get them to understand and be motivated by such change. It's the only way it will work. If you can prove to them that their work lives will be simpler and more productive by following such implementations, then you'll be successful.

Anyhow, I hope this helps.

Regards,
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mark_l100
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Joined: Aug 29, 2006
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Tue Aug 29, 2006 7:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

jeffendy wrote:
For example if the end user calls the Service Desk reporting that his/her cable TV line is broken, it is hard for the agent to determine how long will it take to repair that line. This is because the telecommunication and network division doesn't have any measurement on this. That is why they can't provide OLA.

Hope that this can make you clear on the remark.

Thanks.


I hope your putting ITIL Processes into a customer service environment like a Cable Co Faults dept. I worked for NTL in the UK for 3 years in the faults team and I think that ITIL processes would fit in very well, especially the service culture which I feel is missing after all of the outsourcing and dept moves they have had.

I'm now working for a UK ITIL Training Providor and think that the service sector not just the IT service sector would be a large market for us.

If you would like some advice on how ITIL would map on to a none IT service desk then I'd be happy to try help.
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ChipPanFat
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Joined: Aug 31, 2006
Posts: 6
Location: Singapore

PostPosted: Thu Aug 31, 2006 3:46 pm    Post subject: first thing Reply with quote

First thing that I recommend my customers is to just ensure that you have accurate information from which build up your support model. Its very surprising how poorly kept such information is for large organisations. User/Customer info, Asset/ Faculty info,..etc..
From there look at categorisating the issues that are coming into your service desk to understand the flow of information that is coming into your service centre.

I think this is a good start, from there look at separating incident/problem and change management so that they can be measured separately.

Only after that I would start looking at my SLA management and controlling breaches/QoS.

However, its all really debatable.
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jeffendy
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Joined: Aug 20, 2006
Posts: 25
Location: Indonesia

PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 3:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you all for the replies.

Quote:
But if I understand you correctly, these divisions are all part of one organisation (or are they also external suppliers?).


The divisions are all part of organization. Only one external supplier exists and the Underpinning Contract exists for this supplier.

Quote:
Is the OLA problem about willingnes or ability? (do all parties want to cooperate? Do they have the means to work on OLA's?).


The OLA problem is in regards to the willingness. They all want to cooperate but it seems that they cannot keep the momentum going.

Guerino, did you mean that we should use the all processes approach for implementing this?

Once again thank you for the replies to all.

Best regards,
James Effendy
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