Search
Topics
  Create an account Home  ·  Topics  ·  Downloads  ·  Your Account  ·  Submit News  ·  Top 10  
Modules
· Home
· Content
· FAQ
· Feedback
· Forums
· Search
· Statistics
· Surveys
· Top
· Topics
· Web Links
· Your_Account

Current Membership

Latest: EFairbair
New Today: 18
New Yesterday: 54
Overall: 146231

People Online:
Visitors: 64
Members: 0
Total: 64

Languages
Select Interface Language:


Major ITIL Portals
For general information and resources, ITIL and ITSM World is the most well known for both ITIL and ITIL Books. A shorter snapshot approach can be found at ITIL Zone

Related Resources
Service related resources
Service Level Agreement
Outsourcing

Note: ITIL is a registered trademark of OGC. This portal is totally independent and is in no way related to them. See our Feedback Page for more information.


The Itil Community Forum: Forums

ITIL :: View topic - Standard Change Process
 Forum FAQForum FAQ   SearchSearch   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Standard Change Process
Goto page 1, 2  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> Change Management
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Buddy
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Sep 05, 2007
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Wed Sep 05, 2007 11:54 pm    Post subject: Standard Change Process Reply with quote

Does anyone have a documented process on how an RFC can become classified as a Standard Change? You always hhear it stated that it should be a repeatable and low risk process, but how do you write a procedure for submitting a change to become a Standard?

Thanks
Back to top
View user's profile
dsemeniuk
Itiler


Joined: Feb 06, 2007
Posts: 41

PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 12:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi there,

We just started to implement the process on how to submit a Standard change.

Basically, what we did is was added a check box to our RFC form for requestors to check if they feel the type of change they are requesting should be reviewed as a standard change.

We, change management get automatic notifcation of this and will review the change at the next CAB meeting to see if all agree. The submitted change still goes through the normal change process though at this point.

Once approved, this RFC, type of change, will be added to our Standard Change List document to formally record all changes that are standard and as well, add this type of change to our tool so they can automatically select it when they do the same type of change again, it will automatically be set to Standard and have most of the information filled out on the RFC, they would just have to put the actual scheduled time of the change and then enter the actual implementation time when the RFC is completed and set the RFC status to implemented.

We will have these automatically closed/completed by a bathc process after 7 days to ensure that no problems were encountered after the change.

Hope that helps.
Back to top
View user's profile
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3313
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Sep 06, 2007 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In order to define Standard changes, you first have to define what is not a standard change or the other types of changes

emergency, immediate, normal and STANDARD

This should be in the change management policy document and spelled out in detail in process and procedure documents

The Change Management team should recommend to mgmt that certain types of work can be standard. They should be low risk and low impact and has been done frequently
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
ARoll
Senior Itiler


Joined: Apr 10, 2006
Posts: 86
Location: Boise Idaho

PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2007 1:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A definition i've held for a standard change:

A change that is defined, contains repeatable procedures and historically has produced zero negative impact to an IT service. The implementation steps will be well documented and versed along with solid testing performed prior to implementation and is typically classified as a minor change. (this is my non-official definition but gets the idea across)

Now far as a process for a standard change. A change will go through the normal rfc process one time to receive initial approval to be implemented. During this lifecycle can have a box with marks to potentially be a standard change(just marking this box does not make it so). As a apart of the PIR a review of those that are requested to become a standard change are evaluated and decided upon to be granted a standard status. For those that are not, they will continue the normal process in the future but will have the feedback on why it will not be a standard change and can improve their own process or documentation for that change to get to a standard status. For those that are granted depending on your tool set will depict how you would implement. However as apart of normal PIR activities a regular review of those standard changes that were implemented should be performed to ensure that no incidents arose from them. Apart this will require the developing of a policy for those Standard changes that do fail or cause an impact a process for re-evaluation of their standard status.
_________________
Adam
Practitioner - Release and Control
Blue Badge

"Not every change is an improvement, but every improvement requires a change"
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
Ed
Senior Itiler


Joined: Feb 28, 2006
Posts: 411
Location: Coventry, England

PostPosted: Mon Sep 10, 2007 5:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To add to Adam's reply

If the requestor has a rock solid written procedure to perform the task, then I would consider making the Change a Standard Change - we ask for notification of a repeat of Standard Changes in order that we can keep track of what is happening. This is then put on the FSoC and also published to interested parties (via E-Mail). One of my questions to the requestor is 'Can you write a procedure for this Change?' If not, the Change remains a Basic Change.

Regards

Ed
Back to top
View user's profile
Guerino1
Senior Itiler


Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 500
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 12:53 pm    Post subject: Re: Standard Change Process Reply with quote

Hi Buddy,

Buddy wrote:
Does anyone have a documented process on how an RFC can become classified as a Standard Change? You always hhear it stated that it should be a repeatable and low risk process, but how do you write a procedure for submitting a change to become a Standard?


In the enterprises we deal with, the categorizations are as follows:

  • Standard Change: Must follow formal and planned Release schedules including rigorous testing, along with a holding period in a staging environment. Such Changes usually have a structured period of time before they can move into the next environment. For example, some firms release to production every Thursday night and require that all Standard Changes are fully tested and put into a staging environment, at least one week before deployment. "Standard" Changes are planned for, well in advance.
  • Expedited Change: Important enough that it must be rushed into the "next" Release schedule/day.
  • Emergency Change: Important enough that it must be deployed sometime that same day, regardless of when the next Release day may be. This is purely a reactive scenario, because of how critical such a Change may be to a business.

In addition to these categories, there is the concept of a Pre-Approved Change, which is a change that requires no review by the CAB. What no one will tell you is that this is just a form of a pre-approved Service-Request that can be executed by appropriate personnel, without any review or approval by the CAB. Most enterprises are loaded with such Changes.

Anyhow, I hope this helps.

My Best,

Frank Guerino, CEO
TraverseIT
On-Demand ITIL Platform
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
TintinHerge
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Nov 28, 2007
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 1:02 am    Post subject: Re: Standard Change Process Reply with quote

Hi

I am Confused between Standard and Pre-Approved Changes - I thought they are one and the same ?

Thanks in Advance
Tintin

Guerino1 wrote:
Hi Buddy,

Buddy wrote:
Does anyone have a documented process on how an RFC can become classified as a Standard Change? You always hhear it stated that it should be a repeatable and low risk process, but how do you write a procedure for submitting a change to become a Standard?


In the enterprises we deal with, the categorizations are as follows:

  • Standard Change: Must follow formal and planned Release schedules including rigorous testing, along with a holding period in a staging environment. Such Changes usually have a structured period of time before they can move into the next environment. For example, some firms release to production every Thursday night and require that all Standard Changes are fully tested and put into a staging environment, at least one week before deployment. "Standard" Changes are planned for, well in advance.
  • Expedited Change: Important enough that it must be rushed into the "next" Release schedule/day.
  • Emergency Change: Important enough that it must be deployed sometime that same day, regardless of when the next Release day may be. This is purely a reactive scenario, because of how critical such a Change may be to a business.

In addition to these categories, there is the concept of a Pre-Approved Change, which is a change that requires no review by the CAB. What no one will tell you is that this is just a form of a pre-approved Service-Request that can be executed by appropriate personnel, without any review or approval by the CAB. Most enterprises are loaded with such Changes.

Anyhow, I hope this helps.

My Best,

Frank Guerino, CEO
TraverseIT
On-Demand ITIL Platform
Back to top
View user's profile
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3313
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 2:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If a change is done / has been done
200-300 times w/o failure

and the impact and risks are know and minimal

then the change can be a standard change

If the mgmt of the organization deems that certain kind of standard changes be automatically pre approved, then viola there is a pre approved change

Just be cause something is standard or pre approved does not mean there is no oversight or monitoring of the standard of preapproved changes

there has to be.
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
ARoll
Senior Itiler


Joined: Apr 10, 2006
Posts: 86
Location: Boise Idaho

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 3:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Hi

I am Confused between Standard and Pre-Approved Changes - I thought they are one and the same ?

Thanks in Advance
Tintin


In my view yes they are the same. in experiences organizations have called it one or the other but was one in the same.
_________________
Adam
Practitioner - Release and Control
Blue Badge

"Not every change is an improvement, but every improvement requires a change"
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail AIM Address Yahoo Messenger
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3313
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

They are the same however, Change Management shoudl always review the pre approved changes to make sure that all the known stuff is still relevent
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
Fabien
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 27, 2005
Posts: 207

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 2:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Standard changes are usually pre-approved, well known, low impact and low risk changes. They are the kind of changes that as a Change Mgr you let happen as long as they are recorded.

Then there are Change Models. A Model is a change for which there is a very clear and approved procedure. The change is not necessarily pre-approved, but the procedure is known and approved. The purchase of approved equipment, for instance, is often modeled that way. "Here is a procedure to purchase a new laptop..." sort of thing. Each purchase needs to be approved, but it follows a well-defined process that is not your generic Significant, CAB-driven, Change.

A Change Model is an ITIL concept that is often overlooked or mistaken for a standard change.
_________________
BR,
Fabien Papleux

Accenture
Technology Consulting | Service Excellence
Red Badge Certified

Twitter @itilgeek
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Ed
Senior Itiler


Joined: Feb 28, 2006
Posts: 411
Location: Coventry, England

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 6:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sorry Fabien

I cannot agree that purchase of hardware should come anywhere near my Change process - My thought process is as follows

I am protecting the 'Production' or 'Live' environment!

Until such time as a laptop is configured, set-up and given an IP Address/ set up for DHCP it cannot connect to a VPN or Wan that constitutes part of my 'protected' environment.

Therefore, I don't care if Purchasing go out and buy 1,000 machines. When they are out of their boxes and ready to be configured - then I want to know - by Standard Change Release notification.

PS Change Models encompass all the Change types from Bl**dy Ginormous (Major) to tichy(Minor) The model is what has been agreed with the business for that classification. (I couldn't remember this being taught in my Practitioner Course so I went back to the Blue Book Section 8.3 to confirm)

Regards

Ed
Back to top
View user's profile
TintinHerge
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Nov 28, 2007
Posts: 8

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for all your replies

I have another Questions : What are the different Change Status for a Standard Change ? I am thinking on the following lines :

New
Accepted
Assigned(if all information is present) or Waiting(if missing information)
Work in Progress
Implemented
Closed

No need for Approved or Authorised - Is that correct ?

Let me know your thoughts
Tintin
Back to top
View user's profile
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3313
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The status for all changes should be the same

The possible ones are dependent on the tool

But the stages should match the ITIL work flow
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
Mark-OLoughlin
Senior Itiler


Joined: Oct 12, 2007
Posts: 306
Location: Ireland

PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2007 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

I woukd recommend keeping the status to a minimun - don't have any just for the sake of it. The more admin your support teams have to do withthe CR's the more of their time is taken up.

Build a workflow to suit your needs. I would recommend an approved status or at the very least and approved flag that can be filtered on.

In some cases you may not need an "assigned" status. If the support tool has the option to assign to users this can be taken as the CR is assigned - but ensure there is a workflow for accepting assignments or returning them -- ownership of the CR moves to the current "assignee"
_________________
Mark O'Loughlin
ITSM / ITIL Consultant
Back to top
View user's profile
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> Change Management All times are GMT + 10 Hours
Goto page 1, 2  Next
Page 1 of 2

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Powered by phpBB 2.0.8 © 2001 phpBB Group
phpBB port v2.1 based on Tom Nitzschner's phpbb2.0.6 upgraded to phpBB 2.0.4 standalone was developed and tested by:
ArtificialIntel, ChatServ, mikem,
sixonetonoffun and Paul Laudanski (aka Zhen-Xjell).

Version 2.1 by Nuke Cops 2003 http://www.nukecops.com

Forums ©

 

Logos/trademarks property of respective owner. Comments property of poster. Rest 2004 Itil Community for Service Management & Foundation Certification. SV
Site source copyright (c)2003, and is Free Software under the GNU / GPL licence. All Rights Are Reserved.