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KPI's for Change Management

 
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kanna
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 05, 2006 1:56 pm    Post subject: KPI's for Change Management Reply with quote

Hi,

Can anyone please tell me the key performance indicators related to change management process area?

Also, which process areas are related to change management process area.

Pradeep
prad1701@gmail.com
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Ziad
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PostPosted: Sun Nov 05, 2006 5:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

- Accuracy of the CMDB, some companies I know put a level of accuracy as a target (ie: 70%)
- The number of refused RFCs because of incomplete data in the CMDB
- Number of occasions on which a Configuration was found unaithorized
- Incidents and problems that can be tracked to incorrect changes
- The cycle time to approve and implement changes
- Licenses that have been wasted or not used at a particular location.
...

Cheers,
Z!
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Rose
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PostPosted: Sun Dec 03, 2006 9:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Many processes integrate into change:

Problem mgmt will initiate RFC for a permananent solution to a problem and should have tight integration into the change management tools and process.

Service Desk Agent may submit RFC for standard change. (change models for the standard change that is created via Change mgmt process.) Process integration for this is required.

Change management is closely related to configuration management. All configuration items that go through the change process must be documented and controled via the configuration management DB and the status of the CI updated througout its lifecycle. The CMDB becomes the "authority" for changes in many cases. Via the audit and review of the CMDB you can control changes and track unauthorised changes to the environment. You can do Change without config mgmt but it may never be as effective or efficient.

Change management coordinates the "Build, test, and implementation" that is designed and carried out in Release management. Very tight process/tool design and development between these two are essential.

Service Delivery processes will also play a role in change management. The CAB will need inpur from "Financial mgmt" Capacity mgmt, Service level mgmt, availability mgmt and ITSCM in order to do a proper assessment of change. This cab will take a wholistic approach at the change. Policies and procedures developed in "change mgmt" will be critical to the success of the Change Advisory Board (CAB)
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Guerino1
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 3:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pradeep,

Executives/Management will want to see the following types of things:

  • Proof that while the number of Changes goes up, the number of Incidents and Problems per Change are going down. (i.e. Doing more work with less negative impact.)
  • Proof that the cost per Change is going down. (i.e. Doing work for less than you used to do it, before.)
  • Proof that the time per Change is going down. (i.e. Doing work faster than ever.)
  • Proof that the amount of work per Change is going down. (i.e. Working smarter and more efficiently.)
  • Proof that Change communications and review has improved. (i.e. Transparency, Reporting, Working together, etc. is getting getter.)
  • Proof that the number of Risks Mitigated per Change is going up. (i.e. Risk avoidance is noticeably improving.)
  • Etc.

I hope this helps.

Best Regards,

Frank
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UKVIKING
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 8:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Pradeep,

The KPI should show how the implementation of Change Management has impacted on the IT environment.

Numbers of Changes per period
- by priority type (emergency, immediate, standard, normal etc)
- by classification type (Hardware, software, network etc)
- by life cycle time
-- how much time the engineers took against what they say they did
-- how much time did the change request taje through the Change Management system
- number of changes rejected
-- reasons (poor quality, no resources, violation of policies, etc)
- number of backed out changes
- number of reschedule changes
- number of changes w/unexpected outages
- number of changes not done in OLA/SLA time
- number of changes from Problem Mgmt requirements
- number of incident arising from implemented changes

Frank is correct in that the KPIs need to be data that the management - operational and executive - can use. The KPIs also must be able to be measured so that an improvement cycle (Deming cycle) can be attached to the process

But, I dont agree with all of the KPIs Frank has chosen. Some are not measureable or quantifiable.

The objective of the KPIs is that over time, number and percentages should an IMPROVEMENT due to the Change Management process and also any other process which it supports - incident, problem, configuration, release, capacity, availability
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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Guerino1
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 8:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
But, I dont agree with all of the KPIs Frank has chosen. Some are not measureable or quantifiable.


Hi John,

Being that we specifically help enterprises set up and measure each and every one of the suggestions I've put forth, and can quantify each and every one of them, can you please be specific and explain which ones can't be measured and why? Either we're doing something wrong, which I doubt to be the case since multiple enterprises already use and rely on them, or you may not understand the KPIs I've put in front of you.

Best Regards,

Frank
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UKVIKING
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank

What you have put instead of Key Performance Indicators, in my not so humble opinion, is conclusions which will result from KPIs not the KPIs themselves

While they are important from a Executive and Management point of view, the objective of KPIs is to provide data for the IT Operations people so that they can determine whether the Change Management process is doing what is suppose to.

The KPIs are measures of how well Change Management is doing, not the conclusion which you posted.

If I have 6 months of KPIs of the # of changes resulting in incidents (ie incidents which the root cause is a poorly implemented change) and the numbers are decreasing - even though the # of incident and problems in general; my conclusion would be that

Change Management enforcement has forced the changes to be properly assessed and planned, scheduled, tested and implemented by the appropriate staff thereby resulting in fewer incidents which are due to poorly implemented changes.

If I have 6 months of data which indicated that the average lifecycle of the change request in the system is decreasing, and;
I have 6 months of data that the average # of changes is remaining constant,;

I can conclude a couple of things

a) either the people in the change management process are rushing the changes through the process w/o due diligence to assessment, approval, scheduling, testing etc and implementing and completing

or

b) the process is being bypassed in some way

or

c) the staff doing the work at each stages is more efficient and more effective in their daily routines

OR

It could be something else

Frank, I have been a change manager for 4 years. KPIs are statistical data. Dont keep insulting my knowledge and capabilities in regards to ITIL and Change Management

I said it was my opinion Frank. And to be quite blunt.. I dont care how many people/company/businesses use your product. This is NOT a forum for selling your toolset nor validating the worthiness of it. It is not central to this forum at all. Your toolset may be a prefectly good tool for what it does.

This is a forum for questions on ITIL and its process ... hence the name of the web site, the forum and this discussion room.

Lastly KPIs are NOT proof.. They are indicators of what is going on in respect to a particular process. They only will work if you gather the right kind of data and use the data properly and appropriately.

The statement about 'proof that.... blah.. blah... ' is not how KPIs shoudl be made or used.
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Guerino1
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John,

If you feel that I "keep insulting your knowledge and capabilities", I apologize, as I never meant to do so. I have never once, intentionally (or unintentionally form what I've reviewed) taken any stance to insult you.

However, that being said, I am not speaking about "product". There is nothing in this thread about product. I am speaking about ITIL process and the measurement of that process. We actually "implement ITIL" for a living, John, and not just Change Management. We don't do it for one enterprise. We do it for many, all of different sizes, markets, etc.

And, to be quite honest, you will have to take up your positions on what you believe to be right or wrong with the many IT leaders out there that are implementing ITIL and will expect the KPIs that I've listed above. As stated above, they are not the complete set of KPIs but they "are" what any intelligent management staff will want to see, whether you believe it or not. And, we can say that with confidence because we get this requirement consistently from our clients. As I'm sure you're aware of, to measure the effectiveness of your CM process is to understand the greater impact of that process on your enterprise. Competent leaders understand this and will expect this type of information.

BTW, I went through your list of KPIs and I have to tell you that many clients I deal with would not consider most of what you have in it as a KPI. Changes by priority, classification, etc. are not KPIs. Nor are things like the number of rejections, rollbacks, etc. They're simply metrics. They don't dictate or give you any view into performance.

Quote:
What you have put instead of Key Performance Indicators, in my not so humble opinion, is conclusions which will result from KPIs not the KPIs themselves


If you'll notice, every measurement is counterbalanced with an impact. For example, measuring the number of Changes, broken down by priority or classification, that you run through your environment is useless information. It's just a stand alone measurement that means nothing unless it is compared against something else that acts as a counter measure/balance. So, doing things like measuring the number of Changes vs. the number of Incidents due to Change is far more useful information. If the number of Changes is going up and the number of Incidents due to Change are going down, you can derive many things from these two measures that are linked together, among them the very high probability that the CM process is helping to improve how people work, or at least proving that the transparency into such information is improved.

If an enterprise doesn't have the counterbalance on measurements, they are just metrics, not KPIs. If you want to believe otherwise, I am not asking you to change your opinions. And, while you clearly state that what you're offering is your "not so humble opinion", I'm not offering opinion. I'm offering what our customers "expect" to see of the processes. If you're enterprise doesn't expect such KPIs then consider yourself lucky, because the expectations are lower than most we go into.

Quote:
While they are important from a Executive and Management point of view, the objective of KPIs is to provide data for the IT Operations people so that they can determine whether the Change Management process is doing what is suppose to.


False. The objective of KPIs is to prove that the process is working, for "anyone" that cares about them. The IT Operations staff you point out is working to prove their effectiveness to the people that cut budget for them to exist. If you think otherwise, you're welcomed to do so. But, the reality is that the proof is for the people that will either choose to continue to fund the effort or dismantle it. If any process group is not using their KPIs to prove the effectiveness of their process, then you have to question the effort. Any good management staff will constantly want to see the performance indicators for the processes that they fund. They will want to see that costs improve, quality improves, services improves, etc.

Quote:
The KPIs are measures of how well Change Management is doing, not the conclusion which you posted.


Sorry John, but I didn't post any conclusions. I posted that executive management will want to see those things as a way of proving that the Change Management process is working. And if you think I'm kidding, go to senior management in your enterprise with that list and see if they can come up with anything better. You will find two things:

1) that they will most likely not come up with anything better, and
2) they will most likely ask you for those indicators, going forward. Why? Because they make sense if you're running a business.

You'll note that I prefaced my list of KPIs with "Executives/Management will want to see..." I didn't say that there weren't other things that other stakeholders would want.

Quote:
Frank, I have been a change manager for 4 years. KPIs are statistical data. Dont keep insulting my knowledge and capabilities in regards to ITIL and Change Management

I said it was my opinion Frank. And to be quite blunt.. I dont care how many people/company/businesses use your product. This is NOT a forum for selling your toolset nor validating the worthiness of it. It is not central to this forum at all. Your toolset may be a prefectly good tool for what it does.


John, I never said that KPIs weren't statistical data. So please don't twist my words.

BTW, while you have been a Change Manager for 4 years, you should know that I and my staff have been implementing ITIL for almost six years, since before it was considered to be en-vogue, because we believed in it. There was no tool then, John. And, if you read this entire post, from top to bottom, you'll notice that there was no reference to a tool so it appears that you have some hidden issues that you've brought into this thread. If that's the case, I kindly ask that you contact me offline to address. You're always more than welcomed to do so.

Quote:
This is a forum for questions on ITIL and its process ... hence the name of the web site, the forum and this discussion room.

Lastly KPIs are NOT proof.. They are indicators of what is going on in respect to a particular process. They only will work if you gather the right kind of data and use the data properly and appropriately.

The statement about 'proof that.... blah.. blah... ' is not how KPIs shoudl be made or used.


You're right John, they're not proof. They are indicators of proof. If you think otherwise, I suggest you sit with your executive management at their regular meetings. You will find that there are "Key" measures that they bring to the table... not all measures. They only work with the ones that most clearly impact what it is that they're trying to do... the ones that give them as clear of a picture of their business as possible.

John, I don't know if you're a Change Manager in one enterprise or if you implement ITIL for a living, like we do but from what I've read, it sounds like you only have experience with CM in your one group. If that is the case, I truly suggest you attempt to go out and see how your ideas and opinions work with the many enterprises out there that are trying to implement ITIL... all of them consisting of different sizes, vertical markets, and structure. You may find that you'll learn things from your clients (like we did) that you won't find in those ITIL books, like the fact that ITIL has some serious flaws, gaps, and contradictions. Or, like what "they" see as valuable KPIs.

Again, I apologize, out of courtesy, for any possible insult you may have derived from my postings but I did not insult you, intentionally nor unintentionally. As a matter of fact, if you go back and reread your posts, it was you that dismissed my statements, publicly. I simply asked you to clarify your dismissal of my information, with the KPIs I provided that you had specific issue with. You did not and instead took a personal stance.

My best to you, John.

Frank
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UKVIKING
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Frank

You always seem to sell your product when you reply to any question. It is part of your signature. And I have never heard of it and that is from being in IT operations for 7+ years for the same organization and 10+ years over. But that is not germane to the issue.

My examples are based on what came from the SS

I did not think and I still dont think your examples of the KPIs are what Pradeep was asking for. They might be valid measurements / goals but not the kind I would have used / did use in my reporting to my mgmt. It would be hard in my world to gather some of the statistics needed to provide supporting data for the ones you posted.

We did not have/use a time mgmt system on the staff doing work other than what the engineers stated in the tickets - starting and ending implementation. The measuremenst were too fuzzy - not concrete and verifiable enough.

Remember, while any tool can provide you any sort of data; the important thing is that the data has some veracity to it so that you can use the data to provide a conclusion.

Using a ticket system like Siebl, Clarify, Remedy or any of the other tools for recording the annotation that the engineer is starting on the next stage of work and using a account log system - when people log into servers, routers equipment etc; you have to assume that the following a) the engineer is not stacking the deck like logging into the server first, do the work, record it in the ticket system that he is getting ready to do the work, finish the work, log out of server, reboot if part of the process. then go back to the ticket system.

You have to weigh the data from the ticket system against the login system against the technology against the policies, processes, and procedures for system mgmt, ticket logging and the way the engineers normally work on the systems.

It is pointless to have a KPI or KGI in place and use it when the underlying data which supports or provides input for the KPI/KGI can not be trusted to be any good.

And that is my real issue with yours is that you put the conclusion first rather than the metrics and measure first. For example.

Proof that the time per Change is going down. (i.e. Doing work faster than ever.)

Proof that the amount of work per Change is going down. (i.e. Working smarter and more efficiently.)

My issue with these are as follows

Changes have to be classified - they are usually classififed as type, priority, etc which usually includes which technology is being affected or dealt with.

These two management indicators are more like Key Goal Indicators (COBIT) rather than key Performance indicators.

You want to find out whether the CM process is making the engineers work faster - more effective/efficient.

You cant tell that by looking at ALL the Changes being done and using the implementation time by the engineer and teh lifecycle time. You have to compare like for like - System Changes in June against systems changes in july and so on.

You provided Pradeep with what the report will mean to mgmt ... he also wants what data he needs to get to that point. Your post implied the kind of metrics and performance monitors (statistics) while I gave the details.


============================================

I am being in IT operations for Change Management for a major Telco/Internet ISP for four+ years managing internal customers, external customers IT services under the auspices of Service Support.

I have a couple of follow up questions

Have you taken the Foundation, Practitioner, Manager's course and passed the exams associated with ITIL ?

=============================================

Here is the definition from ITIL Service Support for KPIs for Change Management

Regular summaries of Changes should be provided to service, Customer and User management. Different management levels are likely to require different levels of information, ranging from the Service Manager, who may require a detailed weekly report, to the senior management committees that are likely only to require a quarterly management summary.

Consider including the following facts and statistics in management reports:

the number of Changes implemented in the period, in total and by CI, configuration type, service, etc
a breakdown of the reasons for Change (User requests, enhancements, business requirements, service call/Incident/Problem fixes, procedures/training improvement, etc)
the number of Changes successful
the number of Changes backed-out, together with the reasons (e.g. incorrect assessment, bad build)
the number of Incidents traced to Changes (broken down into problem-severity levels) and the reasons (e.g. incorrect assessment, bad build)
the number of RFCs (and any trends in origination)
the number of implemented Changes reviewed, and the size of review backlogs (broken down over time)
high incidences of RFCs/PRs relating to one CI (these are worthy of special attention), giving the reasons (e.g. volatile User requirement, fragile component, bad build)
figures from previous periods (last period, last year) for comparison
the number of RFCs rejected
the proportion of implemented Changes that are not successful (in total and broken down by CI)
Change backlogs, broken down by CI and by stage in the Change Management process.

Consideration needs to be given, in consultation with the Customer, to the manner in which the management information is presented. In many cases, percentages, and graphical or pictorial representations, are more meaningful than bare numerical data.

Frank you are looking at this from the top (Overall business et al) and I am looking at this from the bottom (IT operations et al)

And lastly, Like I posted in another post, my opinion is my opinion. It has the weight of the chains used to hold Fenris the Wolf (norse legend) which is nothingness. Like the old adage about a**holes and opinions... which always holds true for me.

=============================================

Pradeep, hopefully you take both my examples and Frank's examples apart, analyze them and put them back together.

Frank is right about one thing. What Management wants to know about Change Management is the important thing. Some of the examples I gave Senior & Executive Management may not want but IT Operations management may. You need to find out what your direct mgmt wants to know and what the direct mgmt wants to feed to senior mgmt

'nuff said
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Guerino1
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PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2006 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

John,

Quote:
You always seem to sell your product when you reply to any question. It is part of your signature. And I have never heard of it and that is from being in IT operations for 7+ years for the same organization and 10+ years over. But that is not germane to the issue.


You're right John, it's not germane to the issue, yet you keep bringing it up, even multiple times in this thread, after you said it is not germane to the issue. I kindly ask that you please drop this portion of the thread so we can focus on the issue. I did not suggest product, in this thread, in any way, shape, or form so let's move on.

Quote:
My examples are based on what came from the SS

I did not think and I still dont think your examples of the KPIs are what Pradeep was asking for. They might be valid measurements / goals but not the kind I would have used / did use in my reporting to my mgmt. It would be hard in my world to gather some of the statistics needed to provide supporting data for the ones you posted.


It's an interesting position. I, personally, would have let Pradeep make that decision for himself.

Quote:
We did not have/use a time mgmt system on the staff doing work other than what the engineers stated in the tickets - starting and ending implementation. The measuremenst were too fuzzy - not concrete and verifiable enough.


The fact that this was your experience is valid and I wouldn't dismiss it, at all. However, just because it is your experience doesn't mean that it is valid for the others that are performing such collection of this information, successfully. To say it and qualify it as your own experience is one thing. To make blanket assumptions is another. Please do not assume that because you haven't seen it that it doesn't exist. There are many enterprises in the world that effectively collect and manage such information.

Quote:
It is pointless to have a KPI or KGI in place and use it when the underlying data which supports or provides input for the KPI/KGI can not be trusted to be any good.


I did not imply that the underlying data shouldn't be in place nor would I have done so. It's an assumption you seem to have made, yourself.

Quote:
My issue with these are as follows

Changes have to be classified - they are usually classififed as type, priority, etc which usually includes which technology is being affected or dealt with... These two management indicators are more like Key Goal Indicators (COBIT) rather than key Performance indicators.


The IT leaders we work with call them KPIs. Their expectations are their expectations, John. If you feel you can redefine their views then, by all means, do so. I do not believe that I can. I know these things are important to them because these are the things they ask for. This is why I suggested them.

Quote:
You want to find out whether the CM process is making the engineers work faster - more effective/efficient.


Again, you are translating my statements. I never implied that I wanted to know if "engineers" are working faster, etc. I stated that from such indicators you can derive if the enterprise or organization is working more efficiently, as a whole. And, you can. We see it all the time.

Quote:
You provided Pradeep with what the report will mean to mgmt ... he also wants what data he needs to get to that point. Your post implied the kind of metrics and performance monitors (statistics) while I gave the details.


I did not have issues with your details nor did I imply that what suggestions I provided were the complete list. I also did not make assumptions about what Pradeep was or wasn't looking for.

Quote:
I am being in IT operations for Change Management for a major Telco/Internet ISP for four+ years managing internal customers, external customers IT services under the auspices of Service Support.


This is not long John. Many of the people on this forum have been in IT Operations for decades, including myself and many of the members of my staff. Please don't dismiss our suggestions. We're all just trying to help.

Quote:
I have a couple of follow up questions... Have you taken the Foundation, Practitioner, Manager's course and passed the exams associated with ITIL ?


Me, personally, no. But I have many resources that I supply that have. However, if you have any questions at all about my understanding of ITIL, please feel free to ask them. You may find, to your surprise, that I know the space well enough to hold my own. You may also find that I know areas of the space that you will not find in the books, such as the flaws, gaps, and contradictions that come with ITIL. Please keep in mind that we implement ITIL for a living, John, and as a result, need to understand the space, in detail. My only reason for not certifying myself, personally, is a matter of time... the same reasons that the leaders in your enterprise aren't certifying themselves. I don't have much time because I have a business to run so, instead, I have people that get certified for me and act as a pool of experts I can tap into, at my discretion.

Quote:
Here is the definition from ITIL Service Support for KPIs for Change Management...


Again, John, I did not say or imply that you shouldn't be attempting to collect these KPIs. I simply listed some of the KPIs that are important to Executives/Management.

Quote:
Frank you are looking at this from the top (Overall business et al) and I am looking at this from the bottom (IT operations et al)


You're right, I am looking at this from the top down and I did not imply nor inted to imply that such a view is the only view.

My Best Regards,

Frank
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