Search
Topics
  Create an account Home  ·  Topics  ·  Downloads  ·  Your Account  ·  Submit News  ·  Top 10  
Modules
· Home
· Content
· FAQ
· Feedback
· Forums
· Search
· Statistics
· Surveys
· Top
· Topics
· Web Links
· Your_Account

Current Membership

Latest: LCarrier
New Today: 44
New Yesterday: 58
Overall: 146024

People Online:
Visitors: 54
Members: 1
Total: 55 .

Languages
Select Interface Language:


Major ITIL Portals
For general information and resources, ITIL and ITSM World is the most well known for both ITIL and ITIL Books. A shorter snapshot approach can be found at ITIL Zone

Related Resources
Service related resources
Service Level Agreement
Outsourcing

Note: ITIL is a registered trademark of OGC. This portal is totally independent and is in no way related to them. See our Feedback Page for more information.


The Itil Community Forum: Forums

ITIL :: View topic - Advantage/disadvantage of ITIL
 Forum FAQForum FAQ   SearchSearch   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Advantage/disadvantage of ITIL

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> ITIL Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ramvala
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Feb 06, 2007
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 6:43 pm    Post subject: Advantage/disadvantage of ITIL Reply with quote

Dear All,

What are the adv/disadv og ITIL?


Regards,


Ram Vala
Back to top
View user's profile
alvinaloy
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Jan 29, 2007
Posts: 2
Location: Asia, Singapore

PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 7:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I suggest a search of the forums. I looked through the history and there's plenty of information on that.
Back to top
View user's profile
Guerino1
Senior Itiler


Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 500
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2007 3:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Ramvala,

There are many answers to, both, the advantages and disadvantages to ITIL. At a high level, here are some things to start you off...

Advantages

  • Starts to get everyone speaking the same language.
  • ITIL has made some strong strides to cover IT disciplines in the Production environment.
  • ITIL has the premise of not reinventing the wheel, which is very good and starts to get IT understanding to make things consistent and repeatable.
  • The implementation of ITIL will yield true value to the enterprise, as you will be able to gain consistency in execution, and transparency into details, when it comes to your Production operations.
  • ITIL is gaining world-wide acceptance (slowly) and means things like more and more resources you hire will already have some level of exposure to it.
  • ITIL is rather mature, now, so you can get a great deal of documentation and support on it. As a result, there are also "true" ITIL specific tools that are starting to pop up (not tools that have been rebranded through marketing to say they are ITIL specific but really will do more to leave your enterprise in an ugly state than help it in the longer term).


Disadvantages

  • While ITIL does start to get everyone speaking the same language, its language/terminology is far from complete because it only handles a very small area of IT.
  • Parts of its language/terminology conflict with other parts of IT's understanding of that language, such as how software developers view "Release Management" and "Configuration Management". This means implemening ITIL to the letter will cause instant conflict with other teams that already have such solutions in place, as part of their own best practice frameworks.
  • ITIL only is intended to cover your Production environment and the operations, service delivery, and management around it. It leaves out all of development, engineering, builds, systems testing integration, user acceptance testing, and all other forms of QA environments. As a result, it "misses" most of the information generated in IT, as part of the System Development/Product Lifecycles (SDLC/PLC). When you take into account that a great deal of the knowledge base you want to use to solve your problems comes from the previous environment, ITIL really focuses on the smallest segment of IT information.
  • While ITIL claims to exist to help you run your IT organization like a business, it lacks a huge number of disciplines needed in IT to actually do so. ITIL really is just a small subset of everything you'll need to do to actually run your IT organization as a business. It represents an even smaller subset when you realize that it just covers the management of those disciplines in Production, only.
  • Most people overcomplicate the implementation of ITIL. People and enterprises that lack experience in ITIL tend to implement it one discipline at a time, trying to "scope" its implementation and make it simple. Anyone that has experience in implementing ITIL will tell you that this will lead to far more problems than it will solve. Expenses will be high. Disciplines will be incomplete and in many cases not implemented. Rollouts will take many years. Rollouts will take a great level of time, money, and energy. Tools will be incompatible to each other. Tools will naturally be antiquated as you move from the 1st discpline you rollout to the Nth, which might be years later. Etc.
  • While the premise of ITIL is to not reinvent the wheel, many enterprises will train their people in ITIL and try to roll it out, without any real experience in doing so. As a result, they will DEFINITIVELY reinvent the wheel, as they will try to define, implement, deploy and maintain the exact same processes that other companies have already or are trying to cope with.
  • Many people will try to blindly implement ITIL to the letter. Forgetting that ITIL was created by humans, who by nature are imperfect and who have transferred a great deal of imperfection into ITIL, will get an enterprise into trouble.
  • ITIL has a tendency to be very bloated, because it breaks things down on the assumption that you have all the resources necessary to allocate, specifically, to functions in many of the disciplines. Small and Medium sized enterprises can't operate that way, as many people wear many different hats and, in many cases, processes are leaner and more nimble because smaller groups tend to be able to manage themselves more effectively with less structured process in place (Magic Number Theory). If you want to implement ITIL in Small and Medium sized enterprises, you have to cut through the fat of ITIL and take only the lightweight concepts that add true value to the enterprise.
  • There is no real thing called ITIL "compliance". The OGC has no apparent measurable mark of what it means to "implement ITIL". As a result, you can simply hang the ITIL logo on your door and claim that you have implemented ITIL. And, technically, you have. Realistically, what happens is that enterprises implement a small handful of disciplines, in very incomplete, unintegrated, and expensive ways, and then "claim" to have implemented ITIL with no real measurable bar in sight.


While far from complete, I hope the above will help.

Best Regards,

Frank
_________________
[Edited by Admin to remove link]
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
skeptic
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Feb 20, 2007
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2007 5:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lovely, Frank!

I would add the following advantages:
- elaborating on the common language thing: new staff, consultants and auditors all benefit from understanding what you are on about
- ITIl defines the roles people play, not just the processes
- ITIl defines the interfaces between processes instead of treating them in isolation (not perfectly i know but it is a start)

and disadvantages:
-There is no certification of tools
- As Frank said, there is no standard to certify your organisation against to prove you made it, for example when satisfying auditors, responding to tenders, or meeting client or parent company compliance requirements
- there is no academic/scientific evidence for ITIL to help in justifying the project
- there is no formal forum for discussion, feedback or support, just informal ones like this one
- ITIL is written by Western English-speaking big business consultants. Not only is it not a good fit for small businesses but it can be uncomfortable for academia, government (especially local govt), and foreign cultures.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
ramvala
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Feb 06, 2007
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2007 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Very much frank!!

It help lots,

what is the standard period to deply ITIL solution in organiztion of having 500 employee ?

What about CA unicentre, IBM Tivoli or BMC's solution??

Regards,

Ram Vala
Back to top
View user's profile
Guerino1
Senior Itiler


Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 500
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Mon Apr 23, 2007 10:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Ram Vala,

The time to deploy really depends on the scope of your rollout and your rollout path.

When you say that your organization is 500 people, I don't know if that is 500 total employees or 500 IT employees, in a much larger enterprise.

If your enterprise is only 500 people, it may actually suffer from all the 'heaviness' that comes from ITIL, so you may want to consider an ITIL 'light' version that allows you to stay quick and nimble while still gaining value from the best parts of ITIL.

If it's that you have 500 IT employees that you're rolling out ITIL to, then some more rigorous processes will need to be put in place. Still, though, I would recommend that you always keep your processes as light weight as possible.

We've noticed that in larger enterprises, things like securing budgets, consensus meetings for buy-in, tool customizations, role identification, systems integrations, etc. will drag the implementation time out, significantly.

The tools you mention all have value in specific areas. Again, it depends on what you're trying to achieve and based on the little information I have available, it's hard for me to answer. I've seen implementations that take a few weeks for multiple ITIL disciplines, in smaller enterprises, to implementations that take 18 to 24 months for a single discipline, in large enterprises.

One thing that I woud recommend from personal experience, based both from being a consumer of ITIL and now being a vendor of ITIL solutions, is that you worry about going half a mile deep and a mile wide, as opposed to a mile deep and an inch wide. Most enterprises will focus on rolling out one discipline at a time, in a very rigorous manner, that will yield little return on investment, after a certain point in the implementation. The enterprises that I see having the most success are those that try to quickly implement nothing more than the basics of each relevant discipline, with the intent that each discipline can be iteratively improved over time. This latter approach allows them to implement faster and get far more benefit from ITIL, very quickly.

I hope this helps.

My Best,

Frank
_________________
[Edited by Admin to remove link]
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
ramvala
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Feb 06, 2007
Posts: 7

PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2007 5:20 pm    Post subject: thanks again Reply with quote

Hello Mr. Frank

Thanks again, It helpsme lot.

I am briefing you, we have around 50 people who are dedicated to IT infrastructure services . I was asking for 500 people that would for knowing what if in this scenario.


Is it use ful to develop business use cases before deploy the ITIL ??

In my view that would help in the self assessment before deploying ITIL.


Thanks & regards,

Ram Vala

India
Back to top
View user's profile
ermanu
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Sep 18, 2006
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Wed Apr 25, 2007 6:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Frank another question is the certification
For the certification
ITIL=Lightweight ITIL?
Thank you
Erman
Back to top
View user's profile
Guerino1
Senior Itiler


Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 500
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2007 12:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Erman,

I'm sorry. Maybe I'm dense today but I don't understand your point. Could I trouble you to please elaborate for me?

My Best,

Frank
_________________
[Edited by Admin to remove link]
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
ermanu
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Sep 18, 2006
Posts: 9

PostPosted: Thu Apr 26, 2007 11:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Frank,
Is there any ITIL certificate for the companies?
Thank you
erman
Back to top
View user's profile
insider
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Mar 28, 2007
Posts: 12

PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 12:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try having a read of a few threads to get a general feel for ITIL and what's involved.

You'll soon see that ITIL is not certifiable, but is a set of industry best practices that can be adopted in different ways. For certification, you can try and implement ISO20 000
Back to top
View user's profile
Guerino1
Senior Itiler


Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 500
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello Erman,

ermanu wrote:
Hello Frank,
Is there any ITIL certificate for the companies?


The closest thing to ITIL certification for companies is ISO 20000. However, to the best of my knowledge and based on a conversation I just had with one of the authors of ITIL v3, ISO 20000 is not formally accepted by the OGC as the bar for ITIL compliance. Technically, all you can claim is that you're enterprise is, at best, certified in ITIL with respect to the bar set by the ISO.

I hope this helps.

My Best,

Frank Guerino, CEO
TraverseIT
On-Demand ITIL
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Guerino1
Senior Itiler


Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 500
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2007 11:10 am    Post subject: Re: thanks again Reply with quote

Hello Ram,

ramvala wrote:
Is it use ful to develop business use cases before deploy the ITIL ??

In my view that would help in the self assessment before deploying ITIL.


At the risk of stating the obvious, I will say that it always makes sense to understand what you're doing, why you're doing it, how you're doing, when you're doing it, and where you're doing it. A good business case will definitely help put in place the answers to why, at very least.

My Best,

Frank Guerino, CEO
TraverseIT
On-Demand ITIL
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> ITIL Discussion All times are GMT + 10 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Powered by phpBB 2.0.8 © 2001 phpBB Group
phpBB port v2.1 based on Tom Nitzschner's phpbb2.0.6 upgraded to phpBB 2.0.4 standalone was developed and tested by:
ArtificialIntel, ChatServ, mikem,
sixonetonoffun and Paul Laudanski (aka Zhen-Xjell).

Version 2.1 by Nuke Cops 2003 http://www.nukecops.com

Forums ©

 

Logos/trademarks property of respective owner. Comments property of poster. Rest 2004 Itil Community for Service Management & Foundation Certification. SV
Site source copyright (c)2003, and is Free Software under the GNU / GPL licence. All Rights Are Reserved.