Search
Topics
  Create an account Home  ·  Topics  ·  Downloads  ·  Your Account  ·  Submit News  ·  Top 10  
Modules
· Home
· Content
· FAQ
· Feedback
· Forums
· Search
· Statistics
· Surveys
· Top
· Topics
· Web Links
· Your_Account

Current Membership

Latest: AviaJok
New Today: 33
New Yesterday: 106
Overall: 149910

People Online:
Visitors: 49
Members: 5
Total: 54 .

Languages
Select Interface Language:


Major ITIL Portals
For general information and resources, ITIL and ITSM World is the most well known for both ITIL and ITIL Books. A shorter snapshot approach can be found at ITIL Zone

Related Resources
Service related resources
Service Level Agreement
Outsourcing

Note: ITIL is a registered trademark of OGC. This portal is totally independent and is in no way related to them. See our Feedback Page for more information.


The Itil Community Forum: Forums

ITIL :: View topic - Slow Service - can it be called Downtime?
 Forum FAQForum FAQ   SearchSearch   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Slow Service - can it be called Downtime?

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> ITIL Discussion
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
ManP
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Feb 13, 2007
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:46 pm    Post subject: Slow Service - can it be called Downtime? Reply with quote

If an IT Service is slow, whatever be the reasons, can it be considered as downtime? Can we define like slowness of 20% or more compared to normal is considered downtime. This is what my organisation would like to define.

I disagreed. My view is unless there is a service disruption and users cannot use the IT Service it cannot be treated as downtime. Even though there is service degradation or reduced performance, but since users are continuing using the service it cannot be called downtime.

Am I right or wrong?

ManP
Back to top
View user's profile
Cekir
Itiler


Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 48
Location: Warsaw, Poland

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2007 11:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually it depends on what availability is needed and is defined in SLA.
If it is the service That manages the surgery online or the flight control, then delays in service response is a very serious incident and it actually is a downtime. If however it is a CRM, the user may hold the customer or write down on the paper and then work with the application slowly. In such situation it is not to be considered as downtime. Unless the speed is critical.

In other words - If the slow down of the service makes the system not usable (remember that the business defines it) then it is a downtime.
_________________
Krzysztof (Chris) Baczkiewicz
IT Standards Support
Eracent
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3320
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Tue Feb 20, 2007 11:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cekir is correct

If the service has an associated SLA which states that if the service has ___ periods of time whether there is service disruption of __ duration, an incident ticket is raised at ___ level so the issue can be solved

However, it aint really downtime but the way I used service degration is to equate 1 hour of severe degradation as a fraction of downtime

if the sla does not say anything about degradation in service... then the incident would be raised as a par normal for the type

It also depends on the service, the customers etc

If your customers are commercial and spending money and they cant because of the degradation...then it is a higher issue
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
dboylan
Senior Itiler


Joined: Jan 03, 2007
Posts: 189
Location: Redmond, WA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2007 11:23 am    Post subject: Re: Slow Service - can it be called Downtime? Reply with quote

ManP wrote:
If an IT Service is slow, whatever be the reasons, can it be considered as downtime? Can we define like slowness of 20% or more compared to normal is considered downtime. This is what my organisation would like to define.

I disagreed. My view is unless there is a service disruption and users cannot use the IT Service it cannot be treated as downtime. Even though there is service degradation or reduced performance, but since users are continuing using the service it cannot be called downtime.

Am I right or wrong?

ManP


I would have to say that your view is "old school" IT. In the old school, if service isn't completely disrupted, then it isn't counted as a breach of service. In Best Practice, IT is aligned with the business. If your were a business lead for your organization, would you consider 20% degradation a breach of service?

Even if you don't have formal Service Level Agreements in place, you have Service Level Agreements in place. Lacking formal SLAs, you have perceived SLAs. If the business considers a 20% degradation in service as unacceptable, and you don't have a formal SLA, then you are in breach of the perceived SLA.

This is one of the best reasons to implement formal SLAs.
Back to top
View user's profile
Fabien
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 27, 2005
Posts: 207

PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2007 4:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, I think the discussion is precisely on the definition of downtime.

If you limit your interpretation to whether a service is completely interrupted or not, you will end up in the sort of situation that ITIL is striving to resolve, which is a disconnect between the quality of service delivered and the customer perception of the value of that service.

A more correct definition of downtime would be the status of a service degraded to the point of failing to provide the business service it is designed for.

By this definition, you should also define that threshold in your SLAs.
_________________
BR,
Fabien Papleux

Accenture
Technology Consulting | Service Excellence
Red Badge Certified

Twitter @itilgeek
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
alvinaloy
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Jan 29, 2007
Posts: 2
Location: Asia, Singapore

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 4:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Downtime for me, relates more to an availability issue, while slow performance would be a capacity issue.
Back to top
View user's profile
Jinx003
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Mar 06, 2007
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 6:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Alvinaloy,

I disagree. You might have the capacity to deliver the service. However, due to temporary malfunction, the level of service might be down or degraded. Hence, it cannot be a capacity issue.

I totally agree with Cekir's and UKVIKING's answer. Its the SLA which helps you in classifying if there is a downtime of service when you have partial service available.

Jinx003
Back to top
View user's profile Yahoo Messenger
goitilcouk
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Feb 24, 2007
Posts: 19

PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2007 12:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I concur, its all down to the SLA and what constitutes the "service".

This also expands not just to performance but service elements. Let me explain....

We have just had (and are still in) a big debate with our outsource partner re a P1 recently. The "service" is 2 x AS400's in an active passive state with real time data mirroring. As you can appreciate this is a critical system as it drives our supply chain operation.

We have a breach of the data mirroring for 36hrs which meant if we have to go to HA (ie the passive machine) our data would be 36 hours old - hence no useable service!

Our call as the customer was that their was a breach as a core component was down rendering the paid for service not available. The suppliers view was that their was no breach as the boxes were always available to the network.

It comes back to the same thing..... a clear definition of what is the service?
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
GMuir
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Mar 18, 2007
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Mar 19, 2007 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Setting aside the SLA for the moment, the underlying question that needs to be answered is what level of slowdown would still be acceptable to the business?

I often use the phrase "functionally unavailable" in reference to this issue, it helps to link service degradation with incident concepts.

So the question becomes "At what point does the service become functionally unavailable?"
Back to top
View user's profile
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> ITIL Discussion All times are GMT + 10 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Powered by phpBB 2.0.8 © 2001 phpBB Group
phpBB port v2.1 based on Tom Nitzschner's phpbb2.0.6 upgraded to phpBB 2.0.4 standalone was developed and tested by:
ArtificialIntel, ChatServ, mikem,
sixonetonoffun and Paul Laudanski (aka Zhen-Xjell).

Version 2.1 by Nuke Cops 2003 http://www.nukecops.com

Forums ©

 

Logos/trademarks property of respective owner. Comments property of poster. Rest 2004 Itil Community for Service Management & Foundation Certification. SV
Site source copyright (c)2003, and is Free Software under the GNU / GPL licence. All Rights Are Reserved.