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ITIL :: View topic - Problem DB and Known Error DB
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Problem DB and Known Error DB

 
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albert82
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Joined: Mar 02, 2007
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2007 8:45 pm    Post subject: Problem DB and Known Error DB Reply with quote

Hi guys..I have a doubt: ITIL suggests to have two different db for problems and known errors or they are the same thing?

Further: which is the difference between KEDB and KB ?

Thanks very much, any help is appreciated
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UKVIKING
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Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3315
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Fri Mar 02, 2007 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Albert82,

They are not the same thing really

The Knowledge Base database would be used like google or wikipedia to find a FAQ about something or what steps that must be done

The Known Error Database and the Problem database are related but cover different aspects

For example

A notice comes from Microsoft stating that Windows 2000 will BlueScreen if the Rage Graphics card does not 32 MB minimum and you attempt to play Microsoft FLight Simulator 2000 with a Microsoft Joystick.
The solution is upgrade the video card memory.
The work around is reboot the machine and dont play the game until the memory is increase.
==============
The work around and solution would go into the Knowledge base so all the SD would see it. The Known Error DB is primarily for the Problem team
=============
This is a Known Error and it would be put in the KE Database
======
When a customer contacts the service desk complaining that their machine BlueScreened when they connected their Joystick and played their MS FLight Simulator.

The SD would create the incident and recommend that they a) reboot he machine b) quit playing the game until c) request for video card with more memory has been approved and completed

The SD would solve the incident at the first level by using the Work around and inform them of the solution. If the customer wants to make the request for the new h/w. the SD would be happy to start that.

======

When the errors were first appearing before Microsoft made the announcement, the # of incidents would increase but the work around would still be to reboot the system.

The problem management team would record the 'problem' and work to try to come up with a solution. They would eventually point to the software and hardware issue and ask microsoft or the h/w vendor.
They would have to stop investigation, diagnosing the problem. They dont have a solution. The issue may go into the Known Error database so that when more incidents are raised, they will be linked to the current outstanding problem record..... which is im limbo until microsoft or the vendor come back.
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John Hardesty
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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albert82
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2007 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ukviking,

thanks for your answer! Now it's more clear what a KB and a KEDB are used for.

I still have a problem to understand if phisically a problem and a known error db exist. I understood the difference between them (based on problem control and error control) but I am interested in understanding if the problem and known error record are the same one only with an attribute status changed or with a work-around associated. May you help me?

Thanks for the example which has been really helpful!
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UKVIKING
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Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3315
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Sat Mar 03, 2007 7:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think in my not so humble and more like arrogant opinion that the problem database and the Known error database are separate databases but that they share certain data..

The problem as described in the problem db would also show up in the KE db, but the linked records in the problem db would revolve aroudn what work YOU did to solve the problem... while teh KE DB would link what was found to be the known cause of the problem.... regardless of whether you found it first
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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Guerino1
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Joined: Jan 01, 2006
Posts: 500
Location: New Jersey

PostPosted: Sun Mar 04, 2007 10:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hello John,

UKVIKING wrote:
I think in my not so humble and more like arrogant opinion that the problem database and the Known error database are separate databases but that they share certain data..


We've seen it implemented, both, where they're separate and also where they're the same but a KE is just a tag or a flag on a general Problem record.

The latter seems to be far more common and desirable to the enterprises we engage with. My opinion is they're both right. The only real difference between a Problem and Known Error, to most enterprises, is that the Problem has been verified to be repeatable, valid, and agreed upon, by all, that it's legitimate and worth addressing.

I think that the value comes in highlighting the fact that a Problem has been validated as known, or not so how you track it is less of an issue than the fact that you are, which is the real benefit in this case.

Quote:
The problem as described in the problem db would also show up in the KE db, but the linked records in the problem db would revolve aroudn what work YOU did to solve the problem... while teh KE DB would link what was found to be the known cause of the problem.... regardless of whether you found it first


Again, this isn't necessarily right or wrong but just something we see as one way to implement the solution.

I hope this helps.

My Best,

Frank
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jpgilles
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Joined: Mar 29, 2007
Posts: 123
Location: FRance

PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

IMHO, a Known Error is a specific status of a Problem.

If you cover the problem resolution cycle, you may want to have a single DB where all problems are recorded so you (or the problem management team and the problem management process owner) can really follow them up, and , as important, establish reports , metrics and KPI's on various elements.

The different status of a single problem could then be (more can be added):
* registered
* identified (root cause identified)
* known error (a work around is identifed and -better- validated)
* change requested (still use the work around to fix incidents)
* solved (change implemented)

As for the Knowledge Base versus the Problem Database, I tend to prefer situations where no specific KB is in place but the KB is rather made of query and research facilities between the various DBs (incidents, problems, changes, ... ) in which historical data (even some free text information) are available for each record.

rgds
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pdw1975
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Joined: Apr 02, 2007
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PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Try not to get too bogged down in the question "is it 1, 2 or x physical databases". There is no definite answer to say one way or the other. It is similar to when people get stuck with the idea that a CMDB must be one consolidated database.

A Problem database and a KEDB are simply ways to say group Problems together so we have visibility of issues that we don't have the RC for yet, and group KEs together so we can see what issues we do know the RC and have an agreed workaround for.

The actual 'database' can simply be your Problem Management tool, a whiteboard, a spreadsheet etc.

One of the best ways this works is to have make open Problems visible from your Problem Management tool and to have "KE" as a status, tick box etc within there to discrimnate records at the different stages of the process.

Cheers,
Piers.
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