Search
Topics
  Create an account Home  ·  Topics  ·  Downloads  ·  Your Account  ·  Submit News  ·  Top 10  
Modules
· Home
· Content
· FAQ
· Feedback
· Forums
· Search
· Statistics
· Surveys
· Top
· Topics
· Web Links
· Your_Account

Current Membership

Latest: HXkd
New Today: 19
New Yesterday: 56
Overall: 145997

People Online:
Visitors: 71
Members: 0
Total: 71

Languages
Select Interface Language:


Major ITIL Portals
For general information and resources, ITIL and ITSM World is the most well known for both ITIL and ITIL Books. A shorter snapshot approach can be found at ITIL Zone

Related Resources
Service related resources
Service Level Agreement
Outsourcing

Note: ITIL is a registered trademark of OGC. This portal is totally independent and is in no way related to them. See our Feedback Page for more information.


The Itil Community Forum: Forums

ITIL :: View topic - Incident Notifications
 Forum FAQForum FAQ   SearchSearch   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Incident Notifications

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> The ITIL Service Desk
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Phases
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Mar 06, 2007
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2007 7:54 am    Post subject: Incident Notifications Reply with quote

I have a quick question on Incident notification.

We currently have a process for notifying and updating our internal IT customers whenever a signifigant incident has occured.

The incident is fed to our service Desk and we send an email out to the customers and internal staff


Code:

Issue:                  
System(s) Impacted:            
Site(s) Impacted:            
Problem Reported:            
Time Reported:
Current Status:            
Next Scheduled Update:         
Anticipated Time to Resolve:
Time Resolved:      
Comments:         


However the formatting and layout has left our customers not wanting to read it. It just doesn't flow.

Does anyone have examples or suggestions on ways to notify customers whenever an incident has occured?

Thank you!
Back to top
View user's profile
Cekir
Itiler


Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 48
Location: Warsaw, Poland

PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2007 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Could you please elaborate on WHY do you want to sent such information and WHO is its recipient?
_________________
Krzysztof (Chris) Baczkiewicz
IT Standards Support
Eracent
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3313
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

While Cekir's question is valid

mine are

how many of these go out to the customers on a daily/weekly monthly basis

are the recipients the ones who should get the incident 'canned email' aka 'spam'

Are they receiving one for each incident that happens or alarm notice that happens

or

are they receiving one when there is a major issue.


continueing in another post
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3313
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 12:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Notification of your customers is a triple edged sword

If you send too many, your customers/users think that you have a crap environment

If you send too few, your customers/users will moan about not keeping them informed

You need to find the happy medium as well as the appropriate type of notice

You provide/ask your customers for what level of involvement that they want.
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
Phases
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Mar 06, 2007
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 1:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Cekir wrote:
Could you please elaborate on WHY do you want to sent such information and WHO is its recipient?


This was designed before we chose to implement a Service Desk - so it's been something of a legacy tool. We're not happy with it - nor are our customers.

I don't know that I want to send this much information. What level would be appropriate?
Back to top
View user's profile
Phases
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Mar 06, 2007
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 1:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

UKVIKING wrote:
While Cekir's question is valid

mine are

how many of these go out to the customers on a daily/weekly monthly basis

are the recipients the ones who should get the incident 'canned email' aka 'spam'

Are they receiving one for each incident that happens or alarm notice that happens

or

are they receiving one when there is a major issue.


continueing in another post


Depending on the scope of the incident it could go out to all 2000 employees. Usually we confine it to the list of affected groups.

The current Incident Report is considered spam by most who receive it. But most mail that comes from the HelpDesk/Service Desk is considered spam by our employees. (a long legacy of unintelligable garbage has been sent with no real point)

Each incident generats an email and regular updates. On monday, we had three incidents running at the same time - which generated 15 emails (incidents, updates, resolution).
Back to top
View user's profile
Phases
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Mar 06, 2007
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 1:19 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

UKVIKING wrote:
Notification of your customers is a triple edged sword

If you send too many, your customers/users think that you have a crap environment

If you send too few, your customers/users will moan about not keeping them informed

You need to find the happy medium as well as the appropriate type of notice

You provide/ask your customers for what level of involvement that they want.


We run into the notification problem frequently - too much... too little.

I just recently passed my Foundation exam and am going to Pratitioner Incident next month. But my boss wants us to revamp our Incident notifcation process now - so I'm curious how others notify their customers - that may give me enough for an interim process until I have the full scope of incident management.
Back to top
View user's profile
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3313
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 4:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

First, consider your internal and external customers differently

If you have minor issues, web site it at the IThelp Desk web site with periodic updates

This will be good until the intranet is the issue going down.

Then it will be hard to email/ produces notices

then you need also a phone message system

unless using VoIP

What ever SD tool you are may have a external web site making portion to do reports

then each customer external can configure what they want

we did this with vantive 6 - 7 years ago
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
itilimp
Senior Itiler


Joined: Jan 20, 2006
Posts: 172
Location: England

PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2007 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think I posted on this previously, so briefly I agree with John that getting the balance right is important. Why not ask your customers what they want?

E.g.
For a major incident:
Start of: Publish to intranet, verbally inform the affected service owner, e-mail affected service users.
Updates: Publish to intranet, verbally inform the affected service owner
Closure: Publish to intranet, verbally inform the affected service owner, e-mail affected service users.

For a minor incident: Publish to intranet at all stages during lifecycle

Where the intranet/e-mail systems are down, use a calling tree to inform those that are affected by the downed service.

Also, I wouldn't use a form style for the e-mail. Keep it short and simple as a few sentences which people are more likely to read. State the problem, confirm that you are working on it and the time of the next update if the severity of the incident warrants it (avoid stating anticipated fix time as you may end up setting expectations to high then fail them).

In terms of automation, you could automate the publication to intranet, but I wouldn't advise automation of the notification e-mail personally. Keep it human from the service desk.

Hope that helps.
Back to top
View user's profile Visit poster's website
StevenLynn
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Mar 19, 2007
Posts: 1
Location: Newbury

PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

We only communicate Major incident and we catagorise them 123,bronze,silver gold red amber blue whatever you decide on.

We send SMS to a registered group of individuals who have an interestin the effected services. Update are at timely periods with a customer facing sms and a technical sms, we also do email.

Maybe worth asking your customer base internal/external what they want to receive and then meet them in the middle.

set up distribution lists per service and then communicate template sms/email

Steve
Back to top
View user's profile
Globis
Itiler


Joined: Apr 17, 2007
Posts: 36
Location: Cape Town

PostPosted: Tue May 01, 2007 1:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is an interesting evolution of a question. It started out as: what should my notification look like? It went through 'why notify?' and ended up as "where to post notifications and for what".

However, a number of interesting points and issues arose during the discussions:

1) if the notification is ugly (i.e. hard to read/understand/not relevant) etc.) people do not read it.

2) if the notification is annoying (too frequent, unsolicited, mis-directed) people will not read it.

3) if the notification is either of the above it may negatively affect the perception of the quality of the service.

So the obvious conclusion is that notifications should be easy to understand, attractively presented, properly directed and of an appropriate frequency. Easy!

Of course whilst the conclusion above is possibly accurate, it is as useful as a chocolate teapot.

So here's my 5p's worth:

All of these questions are related to the service. The Service Manager in consultation with the customer should decide these things. Each SLA should detail who is to be notified in the event on a service outage, how that notification occurs, etc. This will be different for different services. As lots of people said, ask the customer!

IMHO under-notification is better overall than over-notification. As Margaret Thatcher's husband once said: 'It's better to keep your mouth shut and have people think you are a fool, than to open it and remove any lingering doubt.'

Avoid automated notification systems for all but a very limited number of people. You do not want your incident management process becoming part of the problem, i.e. your system detects the network is slow, so it sends an email to 2000 employees saying the network is slow. Oh dear.

The network is swamped with email and gets even slower. Users smack their foreheads in wonder at the utter idiots in IT. I've seen this happen (both the emails and the smacked foreheads).

If a problem is major you do not need to tell people about it, they will already know. If a problem is minor, why tell anyone more than you need to?

If you have a reasonably IT-aware organisation create a status board of known issues and put it on your intranet. Publicise it: make sure your service desk tell people about it as part of each and every incident intake. Make sure it is up to date!

Done properly users will become used to checking the status board before calling the service desk, and it will reduce the calls to your service desk. Moreover it will reduce costs. You will be viewed by all as an ITIL genius.

Track number of incidents calls to the SD versus number of hits on the status board per service to measure this strategem's effectiveness.

Cheers,

Dave
Back to top
View user's profile
jpgilles
Senior Itiler


Joined: Mar 29, 2007
Posts: 123
Location: FRance

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2007 8:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

very interesting and good points in this thread...

I am adding my 2c contribution:
By experience, most users are not interested with too much details on incidents. Their only issue is basically "does it work? Can I do MY work?"
The best (in my mind) I have seen in terms of user communcations were websites with very basic information, like:
* the list of the various services provided by IT (from the service catalogue) - one by row
* the list of the various customers /user community (one by column)
* for each intersection (1 "cell"= 1 service for 1 customer) a colored indicator with Green=OK (within SLA), Orange = degradated service , red: KO (unavailable) -very elaborated isn't it?
when orange or red , clicking on the cell allows to either get more information or get a link to find information ... What pieces of information are availble at this stage relates to everything said before on this topic.

Of course you need to plan for accomodation in case the page is not accessible....
_________________
JP Gilles
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Cekir
Itiler


Joined: Jan 12, 2007
Posts: 48
Location: Warsaw, Poland

PostPosted: Mon May 07, 2007 7:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Globis wrote:
This is an interesting evolution of a question. It started out as: what should my notification look like? It went through 'why notify?' and ended up as "where to post notifications and for what".


My point about WHY and WHO was that answering these questions will be the base to answer the initial question.

If you are sending it to an permanent auditor (WHO), they would probably want to know all the details. Then you send detailed messages every time the SLA is breached, because this is what they what to be informed about (WHY).

If you are sending it to the users (WHO), you send only information about when they will be able to get back to work when there is a serious unavailability as this is the only thing they care about (WHY).
_________________
Krzysztof (Chris) Baczkiewicz
IT Standards Support
Eracent
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> The ITIL Service Desk All times are GMT + 10 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Powered by phpBB 2.0.8 © 2001 phpBB Group
phpBB port v2.1 based on Tom Nitzschner's phpbb2.0.6 upgraded to phpBB 2.0.4 standalone was developed and tested by:
ArtificialIntel, ChatServ, mikem,
sixonetonoffun and Paul Laudanski (aka Zhen-Xjell).

Version 2.1 by Nuke Cops 2003 http://www.nukecops.com

Forums ©

 

Logos/trademarks property of respective owner. Comments property of poster. Rest 2004 Itil Community for Service Management & Foundation Certification. SV
Site source copyright (c)2003, and is Free Software under the GNU / GPL licence. All Rights Are Reserved.