Search
Topics
  Create an account Home  ·  Topics  ·  Downloads  ·  Your Account  ·  Submit News  ·  Top 10  
Modules
· Home
· Content
· FAQ
· Feedback
· Forums
· Search
· Statistics
· Surveys
· Top
· Topics
· Web Links
· Your_Account

Current Membership

Latest: pawegrav
New Today: 25
New Yesterday: 172
Overall: 130761

People Online:
Visitors: 72
Members: 4
Total: 76 .

Languages
Select Interface Language:


Major ITIL Portals
For general information and resources, ITIL and ITSM World is the most well known for both ITIL and ITIL Books. A shorter snapshot approach can be found at ITIL Zone

Related Resources
Service related resources
Service Level Agreement
Outsourcing

Note: ITIL is a registered trademark of OGC. This portal is totally independent and is in no way related to them. See our Feedback Page for more information.


The Itil Community Forum: Forums

ITIL :: View topic - Ideal CAB agenda
 Forum FAQForum FAQ   SearchSearch   UsergroupsUsergroups   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Ideal CAB agenda

 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> Change Management
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
tigs
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Jan 13, 2007
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 3:04 am    Post subject: Ideal CAB agenda Reply with quote

Hi,

I am new to this and have just joined.
I have read some of the topics on the forum, nad there seems to be some really good advice out here.

I was wondering if anyone could halep me out.............
I have been aked to prepare a new CAB agenda as part of my new role.

Please can someone help me out on what they would consider to be a 'good agenda'

many thanks
Back to top
View user's profile
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3252
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 5:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A good Change Advisory Board Agenda

Changes of course
beyond that it depends on what is the scope of the CAB

you can define the scope of what kind of changes goes to the CAB
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
tigs
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Jan 13, 2007
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 5:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i was thinking along the lines of would i need to list attendees

changes implemented as a result of an emergency
failed changes
backed out changes?
incidents raised due to change?

i'm not too sure about changes re-submitted to CAB? does this mean changes which have not yet been approved and are pending detail from the last meeting?

Also when should an RFC be sent to CAB, what stage of the process? in my current company changes go through CAB at the beginning

thanks Shocked
Back to top
View user's profile
dboylan
Senior Itiler


Joined: Jan 03, 2007
Posts: 189
Location: Redmond, WA

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

tigs wrote:
i was thinking along the lines of would i need to list attendees

changes implemented as a result of an emergency
failed changes
backed out changes?
incidents raised due to change?

i'm not too sure about changes re-submitted to CAB? does this mean changes which have not yet been approved and are pending detail from the last meeting?

Also when should an RFC be sent to CAB, what stage of the process? in my current company changes go through CAB at the beginning

thanks Shocked


As far as when an RFC should be sent to the CAB according to ITIL -

The ITIL Change Management process is more along the lines of what many organizations consider an Office of Project Management. The RFC is actually the request made by an expense center to spend money or resources on technology. The CAB is there to give three assessments: Technical, Business, and Financial.

Unfortunately in many organizations, the CAB is either a pro-forma group to rubber stamp requests that have already been partially implemented (everything has already been developed/tested and is ready for for the production environment), or are collision prevention groups. They are there to ensure that multiple Changes that could adversely affect each other don't get implemented at the same time.

What should happen is that when a group decides that they want to spend money, use resources, or in some way affect the production environment, that group opens a RFC. The Change Manager exams the RFC and determines if they want to take authority for approving the Change. If so, the RFC is categorized as a Minor Change and approved/denied. If the Change Manager does not want to take the authority, then they review/set the RFC's priority (based on Impact and Urgency) and add it to the Agenda for the next CAB meeting as a Significant Change.

One of the Agenda Items for every CAB should be Assessment of Significant Changes. Those assessments will be the Technical, Financial and Business assessments. The Significant Changes should be reviewed in the order of highest priority first down to the lowest priority last.

When the Change has passed all three Assessments, it is the role of the Change Management Process to then follow the Change through its life cycle. This can easiest be thought of as a Project Management function. This is the typically done by an Office of Project Management who are responsible for managing all on-going projects in the organization. This is, in fact, part of the Change Management Process.

A suggested agenda might be:

-------------------------------------------------

Significant/Major Changes -
Assessment of all submitted/re-submitted Significant/Major Changes (Major Changes that have been blessed by the Management Board)
Determination if any Significant Changes need review by the Management Board (if so, the Change is re-categorized as a Major Change)
Report of implemented/failed/backed out Significant/Major Changes
Review of any Incidents generated from Significant/Major Changes

Emergency Changes -
Assessment of all Incidents associated with Emergency Change requests
Report of implemented/failed/backed out Emergency Changes
Review of any Incidents generated from Emergency Changes

Minor Changes -
A report of Minor Changes approved/denied since last CAB meeting
A report of Minor Changes implemented/failed/backed out
Review of Incidents generated from Minor Changes

Standard Changes -
A report of Standard Changes submitted since last CAB meeting
A report of Standard Changes implemented/failed/backed
Review of any Incidents generated from Standard Changes
Review of any suggested re-categorization of Minor to Standard Changes

-------------------------------------------------

The purpose of having an agenda in this order is to make sure the primary purpose of the CAB is achieved. If the CAB does nothing other than review/assess/approve Significant Changes, then they have met their primary purpose. If you actually have time to get to re-categorization of Minor to Standard Changes, all the better.
Back to top
View user's profile
UKVIKING
Senior Itiler


Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3252
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Sun Jan 14, 2007 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is also no prevention of having multiple CABs either - each with its different focus

An Executive CAB which defines and distributes policy and reviews and changes the process/policy/procedures

An operational CAB for the day to day stuff

A emergency cab for the doh... Emergency Changes

a Post Implementation Review CAB which reviews the closed Changes and how well they went
_________________
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Back to top
View user's profile
tigs
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Jan 13, 2007
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 3:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

thank you both for your help Very Happy
Back to top
View user's profile
matrejekm
Itiler


Joined: May 11, 2006
Posts: 32

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2007 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I am doing this like that:

0. open the meeting.
1. collect last feedback to agenda (mainly aobs to be added at the end of the meeting (2 minutes)
2. Statistics of last period (2 minutes)
3. RfC review by category (as long as needed) with recommendation (I ask people to prepare recommendations before the meetings - so I can collect them all and not waste time for RfC explanation)
4. Review of RfC implementation progress to that RfCs that CAB wants to have knowledge about (YES - we made such a point to spread knowledge about RfC implementation within organisation)
5. Any other business.
6. Close the meeting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Engelbert
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Apr 24, 2007
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 12:49 am    Post subject: Multiple CABS? Reply with quote

In this context, I'd also like to ask a question:

What about an organization in wich you have different types of products or different types of technology?

Can you establish more than one CAB? and not in the lines of establishing CABS with different purposes, I mean four CABS with the same purpose, only regarding different technologies.

To be more specific: we are a Telecommunications company that provides Fixed Landlines, Mobile Voice Service, Mobile Data Services, DSL, Dialup and every flavor of the communication pie you may think of.

In our case, we already have a CAB in the IT department following ITIL guidelines and I'm leading the project to establish a change management process in the Operations Department.

One of my questions at this point would be if any of you would shed some light in the matter of multiple CABs with the same purpose.

For example, I would have a CAB consisting of 8 to 10 experts in the Data Department, another CAB with 8 - 10 members in the Wireless department (each member an expert in a different area of the wireless spectrum), another CAB for Landlines with same characteristics (and an expert in each landline technology) and a last CAB for Transport Systems (Radio and Fiberoptics).

Needless to say, to convene one CAB would be horrific regarding the size, so now I'm in the middle of this debate of whether to implement one Big CAB (with members attending only if they have changes regarding their area of expertice) or multiple ones.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Engelbert Reyes.
Back to top
View user's profile
matrejekm
Itiler


Joined: May 11, 2006
Posts: 32

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 2:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

Several CABs are OK if their decisions do not have adverse impact on another CAB area.

Cheers,
Mariusz
Back to top
View user's profile Send e-mail
Engelbert
Newbie
Newbie


Joined: Apr 24, 2007
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Sat May 12, 2007 4:16 am    Post subject: Multiple CABS Reply with quote

OK, but what about if they do interfere with other areas and we just have the Change Manager(s) decide wether or not the change could be implemented in the desired time frame?

Thanks in advance.

Engelbert Reyes.
Back to top
View user's profile
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    ITIL Forum Index -> Change Management All times are GMT + 10 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum

Powered by phpBB 2.0.8 © 2001 phpBB Group
phpBB port v2.1 based on Tom Nitzschner's phpbb2.0.6 upgraded to phpBB 2.0.4 standalone was developed and tested by:
ArtificialIntel, ChatServ, mikem,
sixonetonoffun and Paul Laudanski (aka Zhen-Xjell).

Version 2.1 by Nuke Cops 2003 http://www.nukecops.com

Forums ©

 

Logos/trademarks property of respective owner. Comments property of poster. Rest 2004 Itil Community for Service Management & Foundation Certification. SV
Site source copyright (c)2003, and is Free Software under the GNU / GPL licence. All Rights Are Reserved.