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ITIL :: View topic - Problem to Known Error with no workaround
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Problem to Known Error with no workaround

 
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insider
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:28 pm    Post subject: Problem to Known Error with no workaround Reply with quote

I work in an application development / support area as Problem Manager.

OK- so a 'known error' is a problem with a workaround and the cause known.

But how about a problem / defect with no workaround, but with an identified cause? ie a software defect is identified as a result of an incident, but the incident remains open until the bugfix is deployed. Therefore, there is never a workaround, only a permanent fix. Could this be a 'known error' even tho there is a never a workaround but absolutely a cause is identified and a solution deployed? Or is it only a problem until resolution?

I think perhaps here, the conceptual / ITIL view should change to a real-world view; eg. even thought there is no workaround, once the cause is known, it still goes from being a problem to a known error.

Interested to see if others have this issue, or even what your thoughts are on it?
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UKVIKING
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A work around is not required for a Known error

So it is a known error
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2008 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, the v3 glossary says otherwise. But I think "n/a" is a possible workaround, however undesirable or inadequate.
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insider
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2008 12:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah ok, thanks for your feedback and it makes sense to me.

There is an ITIL statement 'A known error status is assigned when the root cause of a Problem is found and a Workaround has been identified'. But in reality that doesnt have to be the case I suppose
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asrilrm
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2008 8:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

Is "working manually" considered as a workaround?


Asril
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Mark-OLoughlin
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 23, 2008 8:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi,

yes it is. ITIL states that you need to have a workaround and know the root cause for a known error to be classified. I don't go by this rule 100% of the time, instead looking at what suits the organisation. Mavrick approach or not its how I look at it.
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entivo
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 12, 2009 11:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My take on this is:-

While ITIL specify that you only have a Known Error when you have both the root cause and a workaround or perm fix, it is really up to your individual organization to decide what is acceptable as a workaround.

For example, for some organizations it would be ok to tell the end-user that the service is unavailable until a fix is found, or that a particular bit of functionality will not work until further notice. In these cases, "Just don't use it until we say otherwise" is ok.

For other organizations this would not be acceptable. But I think most would accept that on some occasions there just isn't a workaround available. Whether you call this a Known Error or just an open problem is your call.

After all, it is supposed to "Adopt and Adapt".
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entivo
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 07, 2009 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

asrilrm wrote:
Hi,

Is "working manually" considered as a workaround?




For me (and our organisation) the answer is yes. ITIL says that there should always be a workaround. Sometimes there just isn't a viable technical alternative, so doing it another way or not doing it at all has to be a workaround.

My feeling is that where one draws the line on this is individual to the organisation. For example. your SLA/OLAs may descrive the importance and priority of the services and systems in the service catalogue. If something is absolutely mission critical, I dare say there will be failover etc in place which may form part of the workaround. Less essential systems may have a higher tolerance for delay in the resumtion of service and therefore the acceptable level of workaround could well dictate what the organisation is prepared to accept.
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 6:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some people get hung up on the terminology etc. This one easily reduces to a simple concept:

- There is a problem.
- What is the best we can do until it is resolved?

The answer is your workaround in the purest sense, even if the answer is "suffer".

The reason this is so, is that that is the one vital question which everyone will ask whenever the problem rears its head as an incident or a threat or an inhibition.

The workaround is what you do while the problem prevails. There is no theoretical limit as to how useful or useless it is because it is the only answer to that question and the question will be asked.

So, if you have a system that has a box for "workaround" it has to have an entry even if it is "none known".
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entivo
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reminds me of the old gag about the man who goes to the Doctor and tells him that his shoulder is painful if he raises hsi arm above his head.

The Doctor says "Well don't raise your arm above your head then."
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Diarmid
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 08, 2009 6:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Why didn't I think of that. Perfect example. It happened to me (not the joke, the stiff shoulder).

You (mostly) keep your arm down (workaround) and take physiotherapy sessions (resolution process) until you are fixed.

Unless the benefits (e.g. not much danger of volunteering for anything) outweigh the costs.
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