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ITIL :: View topic - Service request vs Service instance
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Service request vs Service instance

 
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champidead
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PostPosted: Wed Feb 22, 2017 8:12 pm    Post subject: Service request vs Service instance Reply with quote

Hi,

We spent some time studying the SID model from the TMF to help us in the modeling of our network and telecom services.
ln short, what is particularly interesting for us in this model is the service classification with the CFS (Customer Facing Service) and RFS (Resource Facing Service) types.
Each service has a specification (a name and some attributes) and can be instantiated.

We are trying some ITIL tools (e.g., iTop and Freshservice) and we want to implement the SID service concept.
What surprises us is that there is no mention of service instance in the tools we tried.
A service can be defined and then requested but not instantiated.

So, I'm wondering if a service can be viewed as a CI (so that we can instantiate it) or if ITIL considers a service request as an actual service instance.

Any help is welcome Smile
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UKVIKING
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Joined: Sep 16, 2006
Posts: 3575
Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 8:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

You have no clue what ITIL is ... do you ?
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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champidead
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PostPosted: Thu Feb 23, 2017 6:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I read a lot more about Frameworx (from the TMF) than ITIL. I'm going to receive an ITIL training soon in my company.
In fact, I was hoping that you can help me to map this "service instance" notion in the SID with ITIL.

In SID, in addition of having service attributes, each service has some operations such as create, update, delete, etc. This makes me think about the ITIL SO, especially the request fulfillment. It has a record of all service requests made but again I'm wondering what about a service instances record / inventory.
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UKVIKING
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Location: London, UK

PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 2:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you google ITIL, the wiki has a very good highlight

That said,

A service is some that delivered to the customer and used by the user
A service provider is an organisation that delivers the service
A service consumer is the organisation that uses the services (pays for it)

A service can contain multiple services (layered or bundled effect)
A service provider writes an agreement that defines the service and how available it is going to be over a period (usually monthly). This agreement is usually part of the contract with the customer. This is called the Service Level Agreement (SLA)

There is usually financially penalties associated with the metrics etc.

A service provider may have multiple groups that function to support or deliver the service. The primary one is the Service Desk. This should be the primary if not exclusive function that deals with the customer and user

Groups within the service provider would have inter relational agreements on how they would respond regarding service related activities. These are called Operational Level Agreements (OLA)

A service provider may have external service providers that assist in providing the service that the service provider delivers. The agreement for the external service providers are called Underpinning contracts (UC)

Incident Management is the process that deals with things when the service being delivered does not match the expected delivery and the customer / users will highlight this or the service providers own tools will inform them thereof.

SLAs are usually against the handling of the incident - how long to respond, resolve etc. These are usually calculated on a monthly basis

Example of a service

A company provides the ability for its users to send email.

The service consists of the following

a server -
a server based mail program
a internet connection so that the server can connect and be connected to*VMU

a firewall
a antivirus / security filter
storage for attachments
a account management domain system -for the users to get access to the mail and to get an individual named email.

So this would make up a mail service.

Does that make sense

client software on the users may or not be the responsibility of the company
the network connectivity of the user is not the responsibility of the company.
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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champidead
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 24, 2017 8:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks a lot for your summary of ITIL.
I found a lot of notions on the Internet and your post helped me to do the relationship between them.
Actually, I feel that I still didn't have my answer...but your post helped me to better locate my problem because I could find some more information about what makes me doubt.

I noticed that some tools and some people include IT services Business Services and Supporting Services (CFS and RFS in the SID terminology) in their Asset.
To me, it represents the actual Service Catalog and it allows to keep track of instantiated services, once corresponding requests have been issued and received.
Then, I found this very interesting article which distinguishes the Service Request Catalog (SRC) form the Service Catalog (SC).

Now, in our service modeling, a lot of services have the same request specification than their class specification. And they need to be instantiated in the CMDB.
In parallel, we have some services that just need to be requested but not really instantiated (e.g., access request, support request about a particular device).
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UKVIKING
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PostPosted: Sat Feb 25, 2017 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

OK a little more detail

A service provider has a list of services that it provides - the list is called the service catalogue (SC). The items in the represents different details depending on who is using it. Some services are bundled together; some stand apart

The customer or consumer would see the server, the description, the costs and the associated SLAs for the level of service.

The Service Provider's own technology teams would see a technical view that may break down the service into its technological parts

The Provider's service design team would be responsible for building and maintaining this

So if there is a services - the mail service in our example , it exists as a set of servers etc.

In addition, there may be a mon production or test setup which is used to manage and test any upgrades.

This is an Instance of the mail system.

ITIL is tool neutral. Understand the concepts before looking at the tool
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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champidead
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Joined: Feb 22, 2017
Posts: 4

PostPosted: Mon Feb 27, 2017 6:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

UKVIKING wrote:
ITIL is tool neutral. Understand the concepts before looking at the tool

I totally agree. Otherwise, tools dictate their understanding.

In fact, as I said, I read a lot more about Frameworx than ITIL, especially about the service modeling (≈ catalog or SC) and ordering (≈ requests or SRC) parts.
I was looking at how to implement these concepts in iTop.
And the fact that iTop confuses the SC and SRC, like any other tools I tried, makes me doubt on my understanding.

My ITIL training will be next month.

Thanks for the help,

Really appreciated Smile
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