Job interviews

Discussion of any ITIL or related issues that don't fit well into any of the above.
Post Reply
User avatar
DYbeach
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 413
Joined: Sat May 24, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Sun May 16, 2010 11:42 pm

I'm wondering what people think of the practice of asking a job applicant to give a presentation as part of the interview process.

For example, round 2 of the selection process for a Service Management role may involve the applicants being given a day or two to review one of the prospective employer's process documents and then giving a short presentation on how it could be improved.

I'd be interested to know what others think of this.


DYbeach
ITIL V3 Release, Control & Validation,
ITIL V3 Operation SUpport & Analysis
PMI CAPM (R)

"In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." George Orwell
User avatar
mnsmith
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 109
Joined: Sun Mar 30, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: North West England

Mon May 17, 2010 4:45 am

Hi

I like the idea of giving a presentation as part of an interview because it gives the candidate a chance to show they understand the subject and role more than simply answering questions. This is especially the case if you use a real life scenario, either from the employee or employers background.

However, I wouldn't recommend asking candiated to present on something generic, such as how would you implement change management. A number of years ago, when I was young and naive in the ways of change, I was asked to give such a presentation in a job interview and I managed to pass with flying colours by using our old friend google.

Mick
Mick Smith
Change, Configuration and Release Manager
User avatar
Diarmid
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 1894
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 7:00 pm
Location: Helensburgh

Mon May 17, 2010 5:24 am

Well, I've done quite a few presentations recently (slides available at £100 per slide - half-price for the "good morning" and "thank you" ones :roll: :) ). It is hard to pitch the more generic ones meaningfully. When there is not a very specific question it is hard to resist the temptation to try to show what you know (because it is not clear what they are looking for) and end up packing too much in too superficially.

My most recent one was "what processes and governance are essential for effective service delivery?" I could probably write a book on that, but how to deliver ten minutes while demonstrating more than a superficial skim of chapter headings and not leaving any gaping holes was a lot harder and I don't think I succeeded particularly well.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
User avatar
DYbeach
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 413
Joined: Sat May 24, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Fri May 21, 2010 9:40 am

I was asked to prepare a presentation on how I would improve a prospective employer's processes. Kinda like a free quote, I guess. I gave them the how as well as the what, but it seems all they wanted was more of the what :cry:
DYbeach
ITIL V3 Release, Control & Validation,
ITIL V3 Operation SUpport & Analysis
PMI CAPM (R)

"In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." George Orwell
User avatar
thechosenone69
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 268
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2007 8:00 pm

Wed May 26, 2010 10:43 am

Well,

I think it depends on the position. Usually in the interviews I get for an IT Service Management Position, I would be asked to write a project with a presentation on one of the processes or functions. I think employers are very careful when choosing those positions as they need to ensure that they are hiring the right person that has the right capabilities and skills, and presentation is one of those.

Rumors say that you should do a certain amount of push ups while writing a Service Desk strategy for some interviews, to test your multitasking skills. Others will test your presentation skills after drinking a certain amount of beers. I have a feeling UK would qualify for that.
Ali Makahleh
Configuration Management(Blue Badge),
ITILV2 Service Manager(Red Badge),
ITILV3 Expert(Lilac Badge) Certified.

“If you can't describe what you are doing as a process, you don't know what you're doing." W. Edwards Deming.
User avatar
DYbeach
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 413
Joined: Sat May 24, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Wed May 26, 2010 4:02 pm

Well, I can do lots of push ups but I don't drink at all which probably means I should consider myself fortunate to have been in the IT industry for as long as I have (since the beginning, as my kids say) :roll:
DYbeach
ITIL V3 Release, Control & Validation,
ITIL V3 Operation SUpport & Analysis
PMI CAPM (R)

"In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." George Orwell
User avatar
Timo
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 295
Joined: Thu Oct 25, 2007 8:00 pm
Location: Calgary, Canada

Tue Jun 08, 2010 6:54 pm

I see nothing wrong with either the push ups or the presentation, or some other form of assignment as part of the interview process. In my unfortunate days working as a software developer (I am using a PC term here) I was asked to either debug printer code or write some on the spot. I mean, what is your potential employee point of reference for your skills - your resume? I have seen some really creative ones, so it's not something I really trust.
User avatar
DYbeach
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 413
Joined: Sat May 24, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Tue Jun 08, 2010 7:42 pm

You are right, Timo.
I can imagine how much of a crock some CVs must be, and I'm sure we have all met people who have grossly misrepresented their ability and background. Some of us may have even been victims of said liars :twisted:
So, asking someone to show how they can walk the walk is quite reasonable.
DYbeach
ITIL V3 Release, Control & Validation,
ITIL V3 Operation SUpport & Analysis
PMI CAPM (R)

"In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." George Orwell
User avatar
greypantherstillwalking
Itiler
Itiler
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun May 13, 2012 8:00 pm

Mon May 14, 2012 12:41 pm

I think giving a presentation is a great idea to get a sense for the applicant's abilities. Of course it depends on thespecific job but especially in a consultant's position you need to be a good thinker as well as a good presenter. So for all those applicants who would lead a team or sell products or services to other clients, a presentation should be obligatory! Just my opinion...
Post Reply