How to deal with delivering just technical requirements?

Discussion of any ITIL or related issues that don't fit well into any of the above.
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irrationalPatience
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Thu Aug 25, 2011 1:05 pm

Hi,

I have been doing the ITIL life cycle courses as a part of an effort to do a first time implementation. And I am having some troubles with the project head, as it is a part of a larger effort to move to an ASP model for the enterprise.

The project head has a focus on technology, and wants me to get the processes implemented that will get him bullet proof Service Level Requirements of the technology. But, he has no interest in implementing any strategy effort or processes to understand what the business needs delivered. Despite me pushing back on doing so. He also does not want to consider capturing/developing the Enterprise architecture except for the IT Infrastructure Architecture, and do the Service Architecture off that and some business requirements he has come up with.

So I feel rather stuck here. His argument is that all the strategic and organizational material in the core volumes is 'PDQ.' And that developing those capabilities won't deliver value to the business for the effort and time they will take. And he has completed and passed the certification course, so I know he has a grasp on ITIL.

Does anyone have advice on what they have done under similar expectations? Am I just trying to stick to close to what the core volumes, and courses I have taken recommend?


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Diarmid
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Wed Aug 31, 2011 5:55 am

The technology does not have service level requirements - the business does.

It is impossible to have a service level agreement without asking and discussing what the business wants with the business.

Is your project manager actually saying "we'll decide what technology we have and how you will use it" to the business? Is the business an appendage of the IT service?
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
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Diarmid
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Posts: 1894
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Wed Aug 31, 2011 6:00 am

Second response:

"just trying to stick to close to what the core volumes, and courses I have taken recommend" is not a good strategy. ITIL is not in any way prescriptive. You would benefit more from simply looking at the issues in your service design and applying your understanding of ITIL to their improvement, prioritising things with greatest value.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
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