ITIL Process allowed to initiate a Request for change (RFC)

General discussion on all aspects of the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL)
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marcoda
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Sun Mar 27, 2011 4:28 pm

Hi everybody,

This is my first post and I'd like to thank everyone for the answers.

I'm trying to identify which processes interacts with the "change management" process and more specially, which ITIL processes can initiate an RFC? Of course, an RFC is an input and also an output of the change management process, but which process gives the RFC as input to the "Change management" process? Are any ITIL processes allowed to fill an RFC (Problem Mamangement, Capacity Management, etc... ) or are there any processes which simply can't do that?


Thanks,
Marco


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Diarmid
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Sun Mar 27, 2011 8:33 pm

A request for change is initiated by a person. It can be requested by a customer, an authorized agent of a customer (including a user if authorized), anyone in IT with responsibility for some aspect of service, anyone authorized within a project that affects or uses services (including improvement projects). Third parties can request changes in some circumstances. You can even allow anyone involved in service either from client or provider to make a request and then run it through more authorization and evaluation hoops.

It is hard to imagine a process related to service with which change management does not interact in some way at some time.

I cannot get a clear picture of your question. For example resolving an incident might require a change. So the request would come from the person attempting to resolve the incident, but I would not describe that as incident management issuing the request.

To give a better answer I need to understand what you want to do with the relationships you identify. If it's just for the flow lines into change management, then it is easiest to depict that as authorized requester.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
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TomOzITIL_2
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Sun Mar 27, 2011 11:15 pm

Some V2 theory, ie: pretty much most processes.

• Configuration Management
There is close relation between Change Management and Configuration Management. Change Management is responsible for authorising Changes in the IT-infrastructure and Configuration Management for controlling and registering the status of the IT-infrastructure. Furthermore, Configuration Management provides the required insight in the relations between Configuration Items (e.g. systems) for assessing the impact of a Request for Change(s) (RFCs).

• Problem Management
Changes are often requested to solve problems. Solving problems aims to reduce the number of incidents by addressing the root cause. However, in case these solutions are not channelled through Change Management, they can cause new incidents.

• Release Management
Changes often require building, developing and distributing of new hardware and/or software. Release Management feeds into and needs to be carried out under the control of the Change Management process.

• Service Level Management
Since Changes might affect agreed Service Levels, assessing the impact of Changes require involvement of Service Level Management. In the case of a Change, which has high impact or high risk those involved will need to be informed.

• Availability Management
Availability Management initiates Changes, which improves the reliability of services. Furthermore, Availability Management often plays a role in assessing the impact of Changes, for example during the implementation of a Change the availability of the network can decrease.

• Capacity Management
Capacity Management should focus on the effect of Changes in the long run, for instance the degradation of response times and the need for more storage capacity. Furthermore, Capacity Management will regularly initiate RFCs to ensure sufficient capacity is available.

• IT Service Continuity Management
Business Continuity & Disaster Recovery plans and procedures can be affected by Changes in the IT-infrastructure, therefore close co-operation is required.

• Security Management
Security Management needs to be involved in assessing the impact of Changes in the IT-infrastructure, because they might cause security risks. Furthermore, Security Management can initiate RFCs to ensure security and verify RFCs in-line with the security policy.

• Incident Management/Service Desk
Change Management provides the Service Desk with information on scheduled and recently implemented changes, which can be used for notification and solving of Incidents. Change Management defines Standard Changes, which can be carried out by the Service Desk.
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marcoda
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Mon Mar 28, 2011 6:54 am

Thanks, I appreciate your answers. In fact, this question is related to a case study that I do for educational propose. Based on a descriptive company article, I identified which ITIL processes the company has already implemented. These processes are Incident Mngt, Request Fulfilment, Change Mngt, Configuration Mngt, Service Catalogue, Supplier Mngt, Release & Dep Mngt. I identified also 2 functions: Technical & App Mngt.

Based on this analyze, I need to find out which of these processes could potentially communicate with the "change management" process (in terms of Input/output).

Possibel inputs are of Change Mngt are: Change database, SLA Catalogue, RFC Record, CMDB.

Possible outputs of Change Mngt are: Change management strategy, Change procedure, Standard change procedure, Urgent change procedure, Back-out procedure, Change database, RFC record, CMDB, Impact assesement report, Forward schedule of change, Projected service availability, CAB meeting report, Post implementation review, Process improvement opportunities.

So, my first problem is that I can't find an exhaustive list of processes which can initiate an RFC, that will be an input of the Change Mngt process. As I can't find this info, it probably means, like you already wrote, that there are a lot of processes that can have a RFC as possible output, right?

Thanks again!
Marco
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BorisBear
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Mon Mar 28, 2011 7:05 am

marcoda wrote:Thanks, I appreciate your answers. In fact, this question is related to a case study that I do for educational propose. Based on a descriptive company article, I identified which ITIL processes the company has already implemented. These processes are Incident Mngt, Request Fulfilment, Change Mngt, Configuration Mngt, Service Catalogue, Supplier Mngt, Release & Dep Mngt. I identified also 2 functions: Technical & App Mngt.

Based on this analyze, I need to find out which of these processes could potentially communicate with the "change management" process (in terms of Input/output).

Possibel inputs are of Change Mngt are: Change database, SLA Catalogue, RFC Record, CMDB.

Possible outputs of Change Mngt are: Change management strategy, Change procedure, Standard change procedure, Urgent change procedure, Back-out procedure, Change database, RFC record, CMDB, Impact assesement report, Forward schedule of change, Projected service availability, CAB meeting report, Post implementation review, Process improvement opportunities.

So, my first problem is that I can't find an exhaustive list of processes which can initiate an RFC, that will be an input of the Change Mngt process. As I can't find this info, it probably means, like you already wrote, that there are a lot of processes that can have a RFC as possible output, right?

Thanks again!
Marco

Marco - free your mind.....ITIL will give you examples but there will be others.

Think about the processes where it makes sense that they would raise RFCs, then you begin to understand
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Diarmid
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Mon Mar 28, 2011 7:44 am

Or try to think of any process that could not conceivably require a change, including to the process itself.

That should be a very short list.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
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UKVIKING
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Mon Mar 28, 2011 8:01 am

Hmmm

So this is a exam or a study question not a 'real world' issue

1. Go back to your instructor and get the explanation
2. Read ahead in your books / material
3. Re-read your material

What are you studying in regards to ITIL, Change management etc ?

NOTE: Also look at COBit which has some neat stuff as well regarding ITIL and Change Management
John Hardesty
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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marcoda
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Mon Mar 28, 2011 8:20 am

OK, Thanks for your help!

Marco
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UKVIKING
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Mon Mar 28, 2011 8:31 am

Marco

What course are you studying for ?

In addition to the other posts, There are some great (ok not so) great diagrams on the official site
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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marcoda
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Mon Mar 28, 2011 10:24 am

In fact, I'm doing a Master of Science (last year) and we had a course about IT Governance (ITIL, Cobit and ISO 20000). When you talk about official site, do you mean this site -> [ITIL Admin: No links please!]

(stupid question I know :) )
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Diarmid
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Mon Mar 28, 2011 11:58 am

doubly stupid if ITILAdmin spots a url in your post.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
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BorisBear
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Mon Mar 28, 2011 12:16 pm

Diarmid wrote:doubly stupid if htto://www.ITILAdmin.net/ spots a url in your post.

Agreed
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