Change become and incident?

General discussion on all aspects of the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL)
Post Reply
User avatar
Steven1980
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2018 7:00 pm

Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:58 am

Hi all I am trying on the main forum to see if anyone can answer me the age old. When does a change become an incident.

I am having the argument that the change window should cover implementation and back out and any bits in between. If for whatever reason the change window is not suffice and everyone knows that service will not be restored within the given window. Then a decision as to whether an incident can be raised should be discussed and potentially followed through.

Correct me if my understand is incorrect and I am just talking nonsense.

Thanks.
Steve


User avatar
AshishPathak
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Feb 04, 2018 7:00 pm

Mon Feb 05, 2018 12:12 pm

Hi Steve,

Thank you for the question! :)

There is a huge difference between Incident and Change.
Incident:
If something is broken or not working as expected or agreed, is called an incident and should be fixed by providing a workaround or a solution as followed by Incident Management process.

Change:
Any modification/deletion in a production environment is a change. Change Management controls the changes where a change is tested in non-production environment, impact assessment is done on the same and dependent CIs, estimated time is calculated to deploy the change, approvals are taken from all the related CI owners, rollback plan is discussed. once all in place, accordingly the change is deployed in production environment within agreed change window while associating with a release window.

Answer to your question: Please discuss with your business representative/Risk manager/Situation manager/Operation Landscape Manger/Component Landscape Manager whoever is available for you. This should be taken as a risk and the change window should be set according to the change.
If change does not go successful, roll-back the change.
If goes partial successful, raise an Incident as defect and follow the same.


Hope this will help you. :)

Happy Learning!

Thanks,
Ashish
User avatar
Sitman
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun May 20, 2018 8:00 pm

Mon Jul 02, 2018 8:29 pm

Steven1980 wrote:Hi all I am trying on the main forum to see if anyone can answer me the age old. When does a change become an incident.

I am having the argument that the change window should cover implementation and back out and any bits in between. If for whatever reason the change window is not suffice and everyone knows that service will not be restored within the given window. Then a decision as to whether an incident can be raised should be discussed and potentially followed through.
Hi Steve

IMO, if you have an agreed change window and this include an outage period, when the outage exceeds the agreed window it becomes an incident until the service is returned to BAU.

An incident record should be opened internally and comms sent to customers regarding the window over run.

Sitman.
User avatar
UKVIKING
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 3634
Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2006 8:00 pm
Location: London, UK

Fri Oct 26, 2018 4:54 am

A Change NEVER EVER becomes an Incident
Neither will an INCIDENT become a Problem

A Change implementation may result in zero or more incidents or it may solve zero or more problems and therefore reduce future incidents.


If the change implementation - as part of the implementation procedures - reboots or restarts a service - and it is noted in the documentation that this occurs - then there is no incident as it occured during the change window. It may be logged however, it should be noted that the cause is the authorised change implementation


If however during the implementation several web servers - not noted in the change request - go down, then they are normal incidents

same goes for when the change window closed...


now the initial investigation should incluDe ... did the change just implemented cause this /
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
Post Reply