Five aspects of Service Design

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EMMCEE-MT
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Fri Jan 04, 2013 11:41 am

Hi all.

I would like to check whether any one is able to provide a clear definition of what the five aspects of service design in reality mean. I know the five points (service solutions, processes, architecture, management information systems, methods and metrics), but what do they actually refer to?

Does it mean that if I am designing a new or revised service, e.g. a payroll service, I need to holistically consider EACH of the five aspects that is,

i) I have to design the service solution per se,
ii) consider whether existing processes fit with the new service or whether I need to compile new ones
iii) determine whether any capacity/availability or other issues with architecture may arise with the new payrol service,
iv) determine whether my service management tools are able to interact with the new service
v) check how I will be monitoring performance (metrics) for the upcoming/revised payrol service.

Is that right? Is ITIL saying that I should NEVER look at one aspect in isolation but ALWAYS get a view on all five every time I am designing afresh or reviewing an existing service?

Thanks a lot for your help!

Matt


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Diarmid
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Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:01 pm

Leaving ITIL aside, why would you not perform these 5 steps? They seem obvious and essential.
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
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EMMCEE-MT
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Fri Jan 04, 2013 1:13 pm

Hi Diarmid,

thanks. Sure they are important. What I am after is to confirm whether my understanding of them (the five aspects) as explained by ITIL is basically correct.

Thanks,
Matthew
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UKVIKING
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Fri Jan 04, 2013 2:53 pm

Why

ITIL is not a requirements document.. it is a set of advice

so you dont need to follwo the exact way itil does it
John Hardesty
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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EMMCEE-MT
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Sat Jan 05, 2013 4:42 am

Thanks John. So is ITIL's advice in this case in line with my understanding (original post above)?

Thanks
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UKVIKING
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Sat Jan 05, 2013 8:21 am

again

does it matter ?

You need to make a decision on what YOUR Organization wants to do in regards to Service Design. Whether you follow the advice of what ITIL says is completely immaterial.

What matters is what is the expecation and capabilities in Service Design and the decisions you make in the first version of service design process set you come up with

Please note that - whether you follow the ITIL book advice - word by word or letter by letter or not at all - you will make mistakes and make mis designs in the process.

So Effing what ?

1 - how else will the people involved LEARN !!
2 - how else will the organization LEARN !!

If you / your organization depend on the books to solve your issues, then why are you employed as well as the other decision makers ?

The company can hire a bunch of 10 year olds who can read from the book....instead
John Hardesty
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Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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EMMCEE-MT
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Sat Jan 05, 2013 8:50 am

John, thanks and agreed. Yet for certification purposes, specifically Service Design Intermediate, I wish to determine whether my understanding of the aspects is correct and not whether (if) they should be followed word by word in real life situations.

That is the intention of my original post.

Perhaps you can be of assistance in that regard.

Many thanks in advance John.
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UKVIKING
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Sat Jan 05, 2013 10:59 am

EMMCEE-MT

Certification for what ? There is no such animal as ITIL Certification for Service Design - beyond the individual...

FOr a company, Certification for IT Service Management is ISO 20000.

It consists of statements such as SHALL and SHOULD. As in you SHALL have a document process. You should have used off white paper.

NOTE: above are not representative of ISO 20K

In order to meet ISO Certification for a specfic service, you have to have all 16 processes in place that meet the criteria and the service can be very narrow or broadly defined.

If you are at the stage of only doing Service Design. .. .pardon the phrase
forget the eff out of Certification... you are not even 1/3 the way there.
In addition, the certification does not care HOW you do it as long as it is documented and it effing works for you and it fits within the defined process

Quit being so hesitant in implementing the process that you have indicated. Quit asking other people about whether your process is fit for purpose - unless they actually work for the same organization, how the Eff would any of us know whether it works for your org.

Do I think you are on the right track .. yes
Do I think you will make errors... yes
Do I think you will learn from the errors you make and make adjustments in the processes where the mistakes are most noticeable... hope so. that is called experience and learning
Do I think you should GFDI or JFDI... absolutely.... (Go/Just F.. Do it)

Now one last point... is this is an exercise for studying rather than a real world situation ?

I ask this becasue of Service Design Intermediate comment you posted --- WTF is that ?
-----------------enough of snarling ----------------------
EMMCEE-MT,

IT Service Management is not merely Follow-the-Book sort of action. The individual in IT SM has to make decisions based on his/her learned knowledge (course work, books etc) and his / her experience using the aforementioned knowledge. The individual also has to have the thick skin and backbone to make a decision and implement the decision and also admit if it is wrong and work to fix it. That is the difficult part.
You need to present your process design (new, updated, etc) to those who will do the work you have designed and get their input.. other wise how do you know if it works or not
John Hardesty
ITSM Manager's Certificate (Red Badge)

Change Management is POWER & CONTROL. /....evil laughter
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LizGallacher
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Thu Jan 24, 2013 2:22 pm

Although I agree with John, to reassure you - yes your understanding of the 5 aspects is correct (ie agrees with ITIL guidance)
Liz Gallacher,
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Accredited ITIL and ISO/IEC20000 Trainer and Consultant - Freelance
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