Terminology - common expression

An open discussion on issues related directly or primarily to the service or help desk.
User avatar
Diarmid
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 1894
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 7:00 pm
Location: Helensburgh

Tue Mar 09, 2010 4:25 am

MiraH,

thank you for clarifying. I agree that "issue" is problematic.

"ticket" or "call" "message" or "communication" are four options that spring to mind. I'm sure there are other possibilities.

They all have their drawbacks:

ticket - may sound too "techie" to users
call - pedantic users will complain that "my email was not a call"
message - may sound too informal
communication - is rather a long word

Different types of users will have different attitudes to these.

Two key points:

1. select a word that fits easily into your culture so that both your staff and the users, as a whole (you can never please everybody), are comfortable with it.
2. make sure the first response provides the user with a reference code (number) unique to that call/ticket/etc. and use the reference in every communication you make.

In the end it shouldn't matter that much because, so long as you are strongly consistent about it, everyone will get used to whatever term you have chosen.


"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
User avatar
MiraH
Itiler
Itiler
Posts: 5
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 2010 7:00 pm
Location: Prague

Tue Mar 09, 2010 6:41 am

Thanks,
it helps.
Míra
User avatar
DYbeach
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 413
Joined: Sat May 24, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Wed Mar 10, 2010 5:54 pm

MiraH wrote:Hi Diarmid, Timo, DYbeach,

Would sound the sentences below "natural" in (business) English?
" ... Dear client I am about to discuss with you the ticket ..."
" ... I have just changed the type of your ticket from "Service request" to "Request for Change" ..."
" ... I am sorry I have to decline your ticket as it was found unsubstantial ..."

------
Hi Mira
You need a comma after "dear client"
"I am about to discuss with you the ticket" is clumsy use of English. I suggest "regarding ticket #####"

" ... I have just changed the type of your ticket from "Service request" to "Request for Change" ..... I suggest you say "I have just recategorised ticket ##### from Service Request to Request For Change" and give the reason

My two cents' worth only. Hope it helps
DYbeach
ITIL V3 Release, Control & Validation,
ITIL V3 Operation SUpport & Analysis
PMI CAPM (R)

"In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." George Orwell
User avatar
Diarmid
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 1894
Joined: Mon Mar 03, 2008 7:00 pm
Location: Helensburgh

Thu Mar 11, 2010 5:06 am

Top of the class DY.

Now for the final one - " ... I am sorry I have to decline your ticket as it was found unsubstantial ..."

for this I would not say ticket, but refer to the actual category of ticket involved (e.g. service request).

But I would go much further and take a softly softly approach (there should not be many occurrences after all). I would ask to discuss the <ticket> to clarify the requirement and if it is found wanting (I don't like substantial here) I would conclude with something like "As discussed, we are having to reject your service request (number ######) for <service> because ..."
"Method goes far to prevent trouble in business: for it makes the task easy, hinders confusion, saves abundance of time, and instructs those that have business depending, both what to do and what to hope."
William Penn 1644-1718
User avatar
DYbeach
ITIL Expert
ITIL Expert
Posts: 413
Joined: Sat May 24, 2008 8:00 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia

Thu Mar 11, 2010 5:26 am

Diarmid wrote:Top of the class DY.

"
See? :lol:

Who says Oztraylians can't talk proper?
DYbeach
ITIL V3 Release, Control & Validation,
ITIL V3 Operation SUpport & Analysis
PMI CAPM (R)

"In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act." George Orwell
Post Reply