How do you handle walk-ins?

An open discussion on issues related directly or primarily to the service or help desk.
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jorgegviana
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Mon Jul 28, 2014 5:38 pm

Hi,

Currently I'm having trouble handling walk-in users and I'm wondering how other service desk managers are handling them.

I work on a small size company (~50 employees), our service desk (3 technicians) only provide internal services.

I wanted the users register request/incidentes or by e-mail or by ITSM portal but they always prefer to go directly to the technician.

The objective of this is to have metrics, build a KEDB and have a better control over requests and incidents.

I tried to make the technician responsible for the request/incident registration but as the users request they directly they always register when the request/incident is already solved.


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Tomek
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Tue Aug 05, 2014 4:50 pm

In my opinion you cannot avoid such situations, because the help desk is for users and shouldn't be protected from them (unless you close the door:)

Think about implementation of following things:
1. Make registration of the ticket extremely easy for Users:
- nice email address plus stickers with this email address everywhere,
- integration with web browser
- just an icon on Windows desktop
- small mobile app on their smartphones
and also checking their status later on

2. Integrate your ticketing tool with VOIP in order to have ticket automatically registered

3. When the user come to SD, then IT SD technician should immediately register the ticket, explaining the user that this way for example he could check his previous tickets or inventory

4. Metrics for SD technicians (make their bonuses dependent on it, but be careful - first measure, later apply KPIs)

5. Educate, educate and educate your end users at any occasion that:
a) they should use self service as much as possible
b) would be great if they call over the phone first
c) then they can go in person and ask
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simplr
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Tue Dec 16, 2014 10:17 pm

This all comes down to consistency. If sometimes you accept walk ups and sometimes you don't then you're not creating a behavior. And as a service desk you need to create behaviors through consistency.

Users don't mind logging tickets if it's not made to be a difficult / long process. And... they should log them 100% of the time before approaching the Service Desk.

Tomek mentioned that the helpdesk is for users, which is right, but it's for all users, not just those who are close enough to walk up and get preferential treatment.

If someone comes up saying 'its critical', we would always suggest to our clients that they enforce a ticket to be logged, and then depending on the ticket, the priority, the role of the person requesting it, we would also advise to look at it as soon as possible.

If walk ups increase your average resolution time / average update time, impact your SLAs etc then addressing this is more important that letting down the few users who will walk up.
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iTurley
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Wed Dec 17, 2014 2:09 pm

It is a culture change for everyone.

At a previous job we did not allow customers (our internal users) to walk-up to the help desk. They were behind closed doors not accessible to just anyone.

Often times our Level 2 techs were the ones who were hounded by the 'walk-ups' while out on a service call. However, it was ingrained in their professional psyche that one of two things occurred (and always with great customer service): They requested the customer submit a ticket via email or phone call to the help desk so their request can be documented and tracked for quality assurance and compliance. Or, if they were able to work the problem on site, the Level 2 tech notified the Help Desk to create a ticket based on the techs provided detail and assign it to their group where the Supervisor or Lead would assign the ticket over to the tech for completion.

The latter did not occur enough to disrupt metrics. I think it's important to tell the customer why it's important to submit the tickets.
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simplr
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Thu Dec 18, 2014 6:17 am

Well said. Keeping the reasons why you're saying to log a ticket at the forefront is important.

Accept walk ups if they've logged a ticket, or a ticket is getting logged.. just so long as there is little to no impact to the remainder of the customer base.
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Kimm
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Fri Jul 10, 2015 2:36 pm

Make sure that your Incident tool can track walkins, such as having a drop down box for how an incident "came" to be.

Most common incident classifications for this are:

Phone
Email (should only be Sev 3 or 4)
Web
Walkins

Unless it is urgent, tell the person that their incident will be dealt with the same as if it was called in, based on the severity. If you are walking about and people are flagging you down... kindly tell them that they need to open a Service Desk ticket in order for you to do any work - that's the process.

Ask them if they need assistance in doing this... and hopefully with this approach you will see a decrease in this type of end user activity.
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Garofski
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Fri Jul 22, 2016 4:19 pm

I think there is no reason why you can deal with walk up traffic. All you need to do is record it as that. Once you have done the work just let them know all the other ways to log tickets which could make it quicker to resolve them rather than walking to the desk.

Its all so good to the nice touchy things now and again to give that extra customer service aspect to make them feel important....
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